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Killers’ Confession | The Shocking Story of Approved Killing in Mississippi | PBS

Killers of Emmett Till Confess in Look Magazine Editors Note: In the long history of man’s inhumanity to man, racial conflict has produced some of the most horrible examples of brutality. The recent slaying of Emmett Till in Mississippi is a case in point. The editors of Look are convinced that they are presenting here, for the first time, the real story of that killing — the story no jury heard and no newspaper reader saw. Disclosed here is the true account of the slaying in Mississippi of a Negro youth named Emmett Till. Last September in Sumner, Miss., a […]

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Hand-me-down: African women in their grandmothers’ clothes – in pictures | The Guardian

Joana Choumali’s portraits show modern African women swapping jeans for kente cloth – and diving into the dazzling cultural heritage of their families. Arabic Sudanese Choumali found her subjects on the streets of Abidjan: women dressed in contemporary clothes like jeans and heels. They were instructed to wear something worn by their grandmother or another older female relative. Apollo Akan ‘Danielle spent her childhood living in Spain, while her father worked at the Ivorian embassy in Madrid. Now she teaches Spanish in Abidjan. Danielle is wearing her grandmother’s outfit. The style and design is typically 1950s. During the shoot Danielle […]

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Black Kids And Suicide: Why Are Rates So High, And So Ignored? | Blavity

… Black youth at risk may even be more difficult to identify than non-Black youth. Teen suicide rates among black youth are increasing. In 2016 and again in 2018, national data revealed that among children age 5-11, black children had the highest rate of death by suicide. For the years 2008 to 2012, 59 black youth died by suicide, up from 54 in the years 2003-2007. Also, the 2015 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s biennial Youth Risk Behavior Survey reported that, compared to non-Hispanic white boys, black high-school age boys are more likely to have made serious suicide attempts […]

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Meet the 15-Year-Old Who Went From an Ice Cream Cart to an Ice Cream Parlor | Black Enterprise

At only 8 years old, Victor “Beau” Tracy Shell surprised his parents by asking for an ice cream cart for his birthday in order to sell ice cream not only to buy his own toys but to help his family as well. Soon, his parents obliged and he received the cart on his birthday, giving it the name Lil’ Ice Cream Dude. Ever since then, his business has flourished. Shell recently opened up his first brick-and-mortar location in Athens, Georgia. In terms of success, Shell has his parents to thank. They not only helped him get his business license and […]

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First African American-owned bourbon brand to debut in Louisville | WLKY

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (Sarah Shadburne) — Victor Yarbrough wanted to do something that would bring positive opportunities for economic growth to west Louisville, according to our partners at Louisville Business First. So, he started his own bourbon brand with his brothers Chris and Bryson. It’s called Brough Brothers Bourbon, and it’s already distributed through Amazon to the United Kingdom. Yarbrough anticipates a Louisville launch in February. “We are working toward basically opening up the bourbon market and using our brand and understanding of Louisville and Kentucky to showcase the talents here,” Yarbrough said in an interview. “We understand what the economic […]

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Future of Historic African American School in Jeopardy | U.S. News

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (AP) — It was expected to be the beginning of a joyous preservation effort: relocating the town’s last standing African American school. But blocked by fumbled permits and mired in controversy, the effort failed. Plans to preserve the Long Point School have raised tensions among several residents in Snowden, a settlement community established after Reconstruction, who disagree over whether saving the 100-year-old structure should be a priority. WHERE IT’S LOCATED The two-room schoolhouse had been lifted to a moving trailer early Jan. 7. It was to be transported from just off Seacoast Parkway to a new site […]

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The Troubling Fate of a 1973 Film About the First Black Man in the C.I.A. (2018) | The New Yorker

Ivan Dixon’s “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” from 1973, displays the bedrock of racist attitudes and assumptions that renders racist policies both inescapable and irreparable. Ivan Dixon’s 1973 film, “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” which is playing at Metrograph from Friday through Sunday (it’s also on DVD and streaming), is a political fiction, based on a novel by Sam Greenlee, about the first black man in the C.I.A. After leaving the agency, the agent, Dan Freeman (Lawrence Cook) moves to Chicago, and puts his training in guerrilla warfare to use: he organizes a group of black […]

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$27 Million for Reparations Over Slave Ties Pledged by Seminary | The New York Times

The Princeton Theological Seminary said it was committed to “telling the truth” about its ties to slavery. Black students don’t think it goes far enough. A New Jersey seminary has pledged to spend $27 million on scholarships and other initiatives to address its historical ties to slavery, in what appears to be the biggest effort of its kind. The announcement, by the Princeton Theological Seminary on Friday, came about a year after an internal report detailed the findings of a two-year investigation that showed slavery’s deep roots in the school’s past. The move put the seminary at the heart of […]

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Virginians push to remember historically black high schools | The Washington Post

NORFOLK, Va. — Vivian Monroe-Hester’s high school textbooks harbored hatred in their margins. As a teenager at the all-black Booker T. Washington High School in segregated, 1960s-era Virginia, Monroe-Hester studied from used books passed along by white high schools. White students, knowing the texts’ final destination, scrawled their animus atop pictures, beneath paragraphs, between words. “They would leave us messages that were not quite right,” said Monroe-Hester, 71, who still lives in her hometown of Norfolk. “Racial things. Pictures of body parts.” But that’s not what she remembers — what she chooses to remember. Instead, Monroe-Hester recalls the joyful lunches, […]

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Remembering the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre When Police Shot Dead Three Unarmed Black Students | Democracy Now

The 1968 Orangeburg massacre is one of the most violent and least remembered events of the civil rights movement. A crowd of students gathered on the campus of South Carolina State University to protest segregation at Orangeburg’s only bowling alley. After days of escalating tensions, students started a bonfire and held a vigil on the campus to protest. Dozens of police arrived on the scene, and state troopers fired live ammunition into the crowd. When the shooting stopped, three students were dead and 28 wounded. Although the tragedy predated the Kent State shootings and Jackson State killings and it was […]

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