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‘We have a long way to go:’ Descendants of first black Americans on race relations | Reuters

HAMPTON, Va. (Reuters) – Four hundred years after the first ship carrying enslaved Africans arrived on the coast of Virginia, the descendants of one of the first black American families say race relations in the United States still have “a long way to go.” The Tucker family, who trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia, has experienced every chapter of African-American history. From captivity on ships to slavery on plantations, to the 1861-1865 U.S. Civil War waged over legal slavery, 20th century discrimination laws and lynchings, the civil rights struggle and to the […]

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“It Wasn’t a Golden Age”: Cornel West Says Democrats Have to Reckon with Mixed Obama Legacy | Democracy Now!

Harvard professor Cornel West joins us from Detroit, where he attended both nights of the Democratic debate. He talks about the troubling legacy of the Obama administration and why he is supporting Bernie Sanders again for president. AMY GOODMAN: Let’s go back to last night’s debate. This is Senator Kamala Harris. Sen. Kamala Harris: After the last debate, for example, I went to a place in Florida called Homestead. And there is a private detention facility, being paid for by your taxpayer dollars, a private detention facility that currently houses 2,700 children. And by the way, there were members of […]

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Trump Fuels Racial Disharmony. Will It Motivate or Discourage Black Voters? | The New York Times

Reid J. Epstein, Jonathan Martin, The New York Times President Trump’s re-election campaign is spending money on social media to push his message to black voters like Mark Greer, a Detroit native. Credit Erin Kirkland for The New York Times. Featured Image — Mark Greer is a black Detroiter so outraged by President Trump’s regular stream of invective toward people of color that he does his best to avoid exposure to him. So when he clicked on a YouTube link last month to watch an episode of “The Breakfast Club,” a morning radio show popular with African-Americans, he was angered […]

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Retracing a slave route in Ghana, 400 years on | Reuters

ADIDWAN, Ghana (Reuters) – Nana Assenso stands at the grave of his uncle, remembering the man he loved but also a past that has haunted his family for generations. His uncle was called Kwame Badu, a name that has been passed on through the family in remembrance of an ancestor with that name who was captured and sold into slavery long, long ago. “Growing up, I was told the story of two of my great-great-grand-uncles Kwame Badu and Kofi Aboagye who were captured and sold into slavery,” says Assenso, 68, the chief of Adidwan, a village in Ghana’s interior. He […]

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From Glasgow to Tulsa: A Scot wrestles with his racial identity | The Scotsman

Martyn McLaughlin, The Scotsman The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921, during which white residents destroyed the prosperous black neighborhood of Greenwood, left as many as 300 people dead and 8,000 homeless. Credit Oklahoma Historical Society/Getty Images. Featured Image Early exposure to prejudice drove Eric Miller across the Atlantic to demand reparations for African American victims of Oklahoma’s infamous massacre, he tells Martyn McLaughlin. was the mixed race boy from Glasgow who wrestled with doubts and discrimination over his Scots-Caribbean heritage, only to grow into the man playing a leading role in the long and painful quest to deliver justice to […]

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History of slaves sold for Georgetown detailed in new genealogical website | American Magazine

Adelle Banks, American Magazine GU272 descendent Carolyn Smith gestures toward gravestones of descendants of enslaved people in Houma, La. Behind her are sugar plantations and the sugar mill where her ancestors worked. Photo by Claire Vail. Featured Image — A genealogical association has launched a new website detailing the family histories of slaves who were sold to keep Catholic-run Georgetown University from bankruptcy in the 1800s. American Ancestors announced the new GU272 Memory Project website on Wednesday (June 19), the anniversary of Juneteenth, the day in 1865 when some American slaves learned they had been freed. Twenty-seven years earlier, a […]

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‘The haunted houses’: Legacy of Nat Turner’s slave rebellion lingers, but reminders are disappearing The Washington Post

Greg Schneider, The Washington Post In this Monday, April 8, 2019 photo, the sword that is believed to have been carried by Nat Turner during his insurrection is seen in Courtland, Va. In 1831, a slave rebellion was led by Turner in Southampton County. He and and others from the insurrection were found guilty and hung. The Southampton County Historical Society is planning a free walking tour around Courtland that highlights historical spots in town, many of which involve Turner and the rebellion. (Matt McClain), Featured Image , Va. — Kids grow up in rural Southampton County hearing that the […]

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