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Despite pushback, Charleston historic sites expand their interpretation of slavery | The Post and Courier

Cedric ‘BIG CED’ Thornton, The Post and Courier A row of enslaved people’s homes are still present on McLeod Plantation Historic Site on Monday Aug. 26, 2019, in Charleston. Gavin McIntyre/ Staff. By Gavin McIntyre [email protected] Featured Image recent years, Charleston-area historic sites have dramatically increased their interpretation of slavery and its vital role in the area’s early history. And some visitors have pushed back, uneasy with hearing a story many feel reflects poorly on their ancestors. The feedback can be particularly harsh with the relative anonymity of social media and a political moment where racism is debated almost daily […]

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Dred Scott Decision: The Case and Its Impact | ThoughtCo.

Dred Scott v. Sandford, decided by the U.S. Supreme Court on March 6, 1857, declared that black people, whether free or slave, could not be American citizens and were thus constitutionally unable to sue for citizenship in the federal courts. The Court’s majority opinion also declared that the 1820 Missouri Compromise was unconstitutional, and that the U.S. Congress could not prohibit slavery in the U.S. territories that had not attained statehood. The Dred Scott decision was eventually overturned by the 13th Amendment in 1865 and the 14th Amendment in 1868. Facts of the Case Dred Scott, the plaintiff in the […]

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The founding family you’ve never heard of: The black Tuckers of Hampton, Virginia | USA Today

HAMPTON, Va. – As Walter Jones walks his family’s ancient cemetery, shovel in hand, he wonders about those who rest there. The gravestones date back as far as the 1800s. Some bear the names of folks Walter knew; some have faded to illegibility; some are in pieces. And, under the brush he’s cleared away and the ground he’s leveled, there are burial sites unmarked by any stone. The cemetery means so much to Walter because his extended family – the Tuckers of Tidewater, Virginia – believe they are as much an American founding family as any from the Mayflower. They […]

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Our democracy’s founding ideals were false when they were written. Black Americans have fought to make them true. | The New York Times Magazine

Nikole Hannah-Jones, The New York Times Magazine ARTWORK BY ADAM PENDLETON. Featured Image dad always flew an American flag in our front yard. The blue paint on our two-story house was perennially chipping; the fence, or the rail by the stairs, or the front door, existed in a perpetual state of disrepair, but that flag always flew pristine. Our corner lot, which had been redlined by the federal government, was along the river that divided the black side from the white side of our Iowa town. At the edge of our lawn, high on an aluminum pole, soared the flag, […]

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