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US city to pay reparations to African-American community with tax on marijuana sales | The Telegraph

A city in Illinois has announced it will create a reparations fund for its African American community through a new tax on marijuana sales. Recreational use of the drug will become legal in the state from January and officials in Evanston, which is 12 miles north of Chicago, have voted to approve a 3 per cent tax on the sales to fund a local reparations programme. The tax is expected to generate between $500,000 and $750,000 annually for the reparations fund, which will be capped at $10 million over the next ten years. The city’s lawmakers will meet next week […]

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Public memorial for the great Toni Morrison set for November 21 in NYC | Lithub

If you are in New York City on Thursday, November 21 you have the good fortune to be able to honor one of the truly great American writers, the late Toni Morrison. Morrison, who died on August 5 at the age of 88, will be memorialized at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine on Amsterdam Avenue, beginning at 4pm; the service is open to the public. Speaking in eulogy will be the likes of Oprah Winfrey, David Remnick, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Kevin Young, Angela Davis, Fran Lebowitz, Jesmyn Ward, Edwidge Danticat, and Michael Ondaatje. Honoring the dead with physical presence […]

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Sweetness | The New Yorker

It’s not my fault. So you can’t blame me. I didn’t do it and have no idea how it happened. It didn’t take more than an hour after they pulled her out from between my legs for me to realize something was wrong. Really wrong. She was so black she scared me. Midnight black, Sudanese black. I’m light-skinned, with good hair, what we call high yellow, and so is Lula Ann’s father. Ain’t nobody in my family anywhere near that color. Tar is the closest I can think of, yet her hair don’t go with the skin. It’s different—straight but […]

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The Color Fetish | The New Yorker

Of constant fascination for me are the ways in which literature employs skin color to reveal character or drive narrative—especially if the fictional main character is white (which is almost always the case). Whether it is the horror of one drop of the mystical “black” blood, or signs of innate white superiority, or of deranged and excessive sexual power, the framing and the meaning of color are often the deciding factors. For the horror that the “one-drop” rule excites, there is no better guide than William Faulkner. What else haunts “The Sound and the Fury” or “Absalom, Absalom!”? Between the […]

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These Moving Photos Show Life in Apartheid-Era South Africa | Global Citizen

Celebrated South African photographer David Goldblatt took up photography in 1948, the same year the all-white National Party came into power and apartheid began in his country. Though Goldblatt, pictured above, was just 18 at the time, documenting the impact of apartheid — the government-implemented system of racial segregation in South Africa — would become his life-long mission. Over his decades-long career, the acclaimed photographer, who died last month at age 87, built a powerful legacy and body of work showing everyday life in his homeland through the apartheid years and after. A selection of his images will be on […]

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