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School district faces $12M lawsuit over ‘racist’ photo of African American students | AJC.com

Parents plan to sue a New York school district for $12 million after one of its teachers allegedly wrote the phrase “Monkey do” above a photograph of four African American students who attended a class trip to the Bronx Zoo in November. A science teacher at Longwood High School took the photo of the four zoology students and then included the image in a slideshow that was shown to the class right before holiday recess, according to reports. The photograph shows the teenagers lined up one behind another with their left arms outstretched and resting upon the heads of the […]

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Her Son Was Careful to Avoid Police Officers. Then He Was Killed by One. | The New York Times (2008)

He drove the speed limit. He kept his car in good repair. Instead of shorts or T-shirts, he wore Ralph Lauren dress shirts. For years before he was fatally shot by a Dallas police officer who says she mistook him for a burglar in his own home, Botham Shem Jean had gone out of his way to avoid even routine encounters with the police, his mother, Allison Jean, said during a visit to New York City on Thursday with her lawyer, Lee Merritt. Ms. Jean said her son had to explain life in America — where for black men in […]

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Don’t tell me I’m ‘too pretty to be Aboriginal’. It’s not a compliment; it’s racism | The Guardian

Aboriginal women are all too familiar with this phrase. In her new documentary, Sasha Sarago investigates the racism behind it. I was 11 years old when my best friend’s sister approached me at her birthday party. She asked me what my nationality was; when I told her, she replied, “You’re too pretty to be Aboriginal.” A cloud of shame washed over me. Two adults standing nearby muttered “Aboriginal!” in a condescending tone which signalled to me that being Aboriginal was somehow dirty. I stood there humiliated. Until this moment, I hadn’t known that I was the only Aboriginal child at […]

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Canada’s first and only all-black battalion honoured with special stamp | Global News

Canada Post unveiled a limited edition stamp in Cherrybrook, N.S. on Tuesday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of black men who formed a segregated unit and fought during the First World War. The company said the stamp is a chance to honour the contributions of black Canadians. “This stamp honours men who stepped forward to serve this country in uniform but were denied the opportunity to fight,” said Jim Dunsworth, director of operations for Canada Post. Natasha Pace, Global News Full article @ Global News Share This +FacebookTwitterMail

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Does the United States Owe Reparations to the Descendants of Enslaved People? | The New York Times

The idea of economic amends for past injustices and persistent disparities is getting renewed attention. What do you think should happen? In 1988, President Ronald Reagan sought to “right a grave wrong” by signing legislation that apologized for the government’s forced relocation of 120,000 Japanese-Americans during World War II and established a $1.25 billion trust fund to pay reparations to those who were forced into internment camps and to their families. However, the United States has never apologized for the nation’s treatment of enslaved people and their descendants. What do you think? Do you think that the descendants of enslaved […]

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The Privilege of White Victimhood | Dame Magazine

We’re in the grips of a peak white-pity party moment. And it has the potential to incite a riot. Being an actual victim of anything sucks. This is a thing we are supposed to learn as we grow up. We’re supposed to grow out of the phase where we get jealous of the attention or the extra toys or balloons a sibling gets when they are sick or hurt and move on to being able to help out in those situations. Not everyone does. This past Saturday, Brian Hornaday, chief of the Herington Police Department in Kansas, posted an image […]

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What everyone should know about Reconstruction 150 years after the 15th Amendment’s ratification | The Conversation

I’ll never forget a student’s response when I asked during a middle school social studies class what they knew about black history: “Martin Luther King freed the slaves.” Martin Luther King Jr. was born in 1929, more than six decades after the time of enslavement. To me, this comment underscored how closely Americans associate black history with slavery. While shocked, I knew this mistaken belief reflected the lack of time, depth and breadth schools devote to black history. Most students get limited information and context about what African Americans have experienced since our ancestors arrived here four centuries ago. Without […]

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White people assume niceness is the answer to racial inequality. It’s not | The Guardian

“While most of us see ourselves as ‘not racist’, we continue to reproduce racist outcomes and live segregated lives.” I am white. As an academic, consultant and writer on white racial identity and race relations, I speak daily with other white people about the meaning of race in our lives. These conversations are critical because, by virtually every measure, racial inequality persists, and institutions continue to be overwhelmingly controlled by white people. While most of us see ourselves as “not racist”, we continue to reproduce racist outcomes and live segregated lives. In the racial equity workshops I lead for American […]

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The Magnolia House used to be a decades-old passion project for one man. Now, someone else shares that dream — his daughter. | Greensboro.com

GREENSBORO — Natalie Pass Miller loved her life in Atlanta working for the corporate sector. While on a visit back home in 2018, a casual conversation with her dad changed everything. Sam Pass, at one time a fire and safety specialist at Duke University, had spent the past two decades of his off time meticulously restoring the Historic Magnolia House Motel. The segregation-era place was a beacon to African Americans looking for a night’s sleep between Atlanta and Richmond, Va. Ike and Tina Turner, Ray Charles, Lena Horne, the Five Blind Boys of Alabama and baseball greats Jackie Robinson and […]

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The Norfolk 17 face a hostile reception as schools reopen | The Virginian-Pilot

Three weeks later than originally scheduled, Norfolk schools were finally ready to open. Well, most of them. On Sept. 29, 1958, 48 of Norfolk’s schools welcomed students – but the doors of six were padlocked and under police guard. Maury, Norview and Granby high schools and Northside, Norview and Blair junior highs remained closed under a state order designed to fight integration. The 17 Negro students assigned to those schools started tutoring sessions at First Baptist Church Norfolk on Bute Street. They took classes in core subjects and Spanish, and were taught to brace themselves for the abuse sure to […]

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