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The chilling details of Patrice Lumumba’s assassination and how he was dissolved in acid | Face2Face Africa

Since January 17, 1961, no one has been held accountable for the brutal murder of Congo’s independence leader and first prime minister Patrice Lumumba who was shot dead with two of his ministers, Joseph Okito and Maurice Mpolo. However, all fingers point to multinational perpetrators who sanctioned the elimination of one of Africa’s bravest politicians and independence heroes who stood his ground against colonizers. He led the Democratic Republic of Congo to independence on June 30, 1960, after the country was passed on from King Leopold II, who took control of it as his private property in the 1880s, to […]

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Jay-Z goes to bat for Mississippi prisoners and files federal lawsuit | NBC News

The rap mogul had warned Mississippi officials he was “prepared to pursue all potential avenues.” Rap mogul Jay-Z sued the head of the Mississippi Department of Corrections and the warden of the state penitentiary Tuesday on behalf of 29 prisoners who say the two officials have done nothing to stop the violence that has left five inmates dead in the past two weeks. “These deaths are a direct result of Mississippi’s utter disregard for the people it has incarcerated and their constitutional rights,” according to the lawsuit, which was filed by Jay-Z’s lawyer Alex Spiro at the U.S. District Court […]

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The Unequal Financial Burden for Black Caregivers | OZY

Carlo St. Juste Jr. is on his way to bring his mother to a hospital appointment when he takes OZY’s call. A part-time acupuncturist and businessman, St. Juste is also the primary caregiver for his 69-year-old mom, who suffers from chronic kidney disease and diabetes. “I’ve organized my time so I can do these things for her,” says St. Juste, 38. Before taking care of his mom, he did the same for his paternal grandmother, so he’s used to the commitment and balance that constant care for loved ones require. But that’s not to say it’s easy. St. Juste, who […]

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Why Aesha Ash is Wandering Around Inner City Rochester in a Tutu | Dance Magazine

Growing up in inner city Rochester, NY, Aesha Ash was just one of the neighborhood kids. She’d imagine people driving by, judging her by her black skin. “They’d never know that I was dreaming of becoming a professional ballet dancer. No one would think, Some day she’s going to make it into New York City Ballet,” says Ash. After an inspiring career at NYCB, Béjart’s Ballet Lausanne and LINES, the January 2006 Dance Magazine cover star — one of our 25 to Watch that year — is no longer performing. But she’s determined to use her dance background to change […]

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Exclusive: Rep. Ayanna Pressley Reveals Beautiful Bald Head and Discusses Alopecia for the First Time | The Root

“I think it’s important that I’m transparent about this new normal,…” Ayanna Pressley loves playing with her hair. Before she became a Massachusetts Congresswoman (and a high-profile member of “The Squad”), Pressley would experiment with different hairstyles and textures, getting a weave and even cutting her own hair. Lately, she’s been experimenting with lace-front wigs. “One I call ‘FLOTUS’ because it feels very Michelle Obama to me, [and another] I call ‘Tracee,’ because it feels very Tracee Ellis Ross to me,” Pressley told me in an exclusive interview with The Root earlier this week. But the wigs are a noticeable […]

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How Ghana’s historic homecoming is changing Africa | CNN

(CNN) — It’s the last Saturday of the year in the heart of Accra, Ghana’s capital. The air is thick with the anticipation of the thousands of revelers who have swarmed the gates of El Wak Stadium to take part in an annual celebration of African culture known as Afrochella. Inside it’s a sea of diversity. Austrian, Ivorian and Nigerian men pose for cameras before inviting an American woman to join. Nearby, two French women draped in the traditional Ghanaian Kente cloth dance to a mix of reggae and afrobeats. At the bar, four British men chat with locals while […]

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When Minneapolis Segregated | City Lab

In the early 1900s, racial housing covenants in the Minnesota city blocked home sales to minorities, establishing patterns of inequality that persist today. Before it was torn apart by freeway construction in the middle of the 20th century, the Near North neighborhood in Minneapolis was home to the city’s largest concentration of African American families. That wasn’t by accident: As far back as the early 1900s, racially restrictive covenants on property deeds prevented African Americans and other minorities from buying homes in many other areas throughout the city. In 1948, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that such racial covenants were […]

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I am not ‘non-white’ | Daily Kos

I’m black. I’ve been black, and proud to be black, my whole life. My parents raised me like that. They grew up as ‘Negroes.’ They had to drink at water fountains labeled ‘colored.’ They lived long enough to become Afro-Americans, and then African Americans. I was, and still am, militantly black. I’ve lived through the “Ungawa Black Power” of Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown; the clenched, raised fists of the Panthers and Young Lords; and through this decade’s Black Lives Matter and #VoteLikeBlackWomen movements. My mom, who was never seen without her hair hot-comb pressed straight as a board, even […]

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Exclusive: Atlanta-Based Entrepreneur Jewel Burks Solomon named Head of Google For Startups, U.S. | Hypepotamus

Atlanta tech entrepreneur Jewel Burks Solomon has been named head of Google for Startups for the U.S., Hypepotamus has confirmed. Solomon is not only the first African-American woman to have this title — a highly significant matter in itself — but she is also the first person to ever hold the newly created position at Google. “I am thrilled about the opportunity to do work I’m deeply passionate about, to help level the playing field in the startup ecosystem,” Solomon tells Hypepotamus about taking the position, saying she’s excited to take on the responsibilities of the job. “I have a […]

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School district faces $12M lawsuit over ‘racist’ photo of African American students | AJC.com

Parents plan to sue a New York school district for $12 million after one of its teachers allegedly wrote the phrase “Monkey do” above a photograph of four African American students who attended a class trip to the Bronx Zoo in November. A science teacher at Longwood High School took the photo of the four zoology students and then included the image in a slideshow that was shown to the class right before holiday recess, according to reports. The photograph shows the teenagers lined up one behind another with their left arms outstretched and resting upon the heads of the […]

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