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When a black-owned funeral home in a gentrifying city has no one left to bury | The Washington Post

The thick, dusty ledgers were scattered about the cluttered office, 18 of them, their pages filled with neat script documenting the deaths of thousands of black Washingtonians over the course of a half-century. Open a volume to Page 123 and there is Lawrence Monroe Ryles, 39, a “colored” postal worker who on Sept. 13, 1947, was “run over by a train.” Turn the pages and find Melvin Bailey, of 1406 Third St. NW, a 6-year-old who died the same year of meningitis. Deep inside another book is Leon Anthony Porter Jr., 18, whose 1990 death occurred after a bullet pierced […]

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Locked out of L.A.’s white neighborhoods, they built a black suburb. Now they’re homeless | Los Angeles Times

Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times Michelle Vaughn, 24, and Edwin Williams, 31, live in an African American homeless encampment under the Ronald Reagan Freeway in Pacoima. Many of the residents were displaced from homes their parents owned in the 1950s and 1960s.(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times). Featured Image Pierfax grew up after World War II in Pacoima, one of the few Los Angeles suburbs that offered the American dream of home ownership to African Americans who had been locked out of other neighborhoods by racial covenants. His stepfather worked at Lockheed Martin to support the family of 15. His […]

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When The ‘White Tears’ Just Keep Coming | NPR

Leah Donnella , NPR about race is hard. It often involves hurt feelings and misunderstandings. And the words and phrases we use can either push those conversations forward or bring them to a standstill. One such term: white tears. The phrase has been used to gently tease white people who get upset at things they think threaten their white privilege. It’s been used to poke fun at white people who think that talking about race makes you a racist. Or that Barack Obama’s presidency marked the end of America. Or that it’s a crime against humanity when a formerly white […]

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Sonia Sanchez Inspires DC Audiences and Weighs in on Gentrification | The African American (AFRO) Busboys and Poets offered up another inspirational evening with none other than the renowned poet Sonia Sanchez. On November 5, Sanchez shared an intimate evening of poetry and dialogue with the D.C. community.

Busboys and Poets offered up another inspirational evening with none other than the renowned poet Sonia Sanchez. On November 5, Sanchez shared an intimate evening of poetry and dialogue with the D.C. community.

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As Obama Presidential Center comes closer to reality, tensions on race, class surface | Chicago Tribune The Obama Foundation’s plans to build the Obama Presidential Center in Jackson Park have sparked a complicated, and at times emotional, conversation about race, class, segregation, privilege and power on the South Side.

The Obama Foundation’s plans to build the Obama Presidential Center in Jackson Park have sparked a complicated, and at times emotional, conversation about race, class, segregation, privilege and power on the South Side.

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How a Historically Black Virginia Community is Taking On a Pipeline and Rebuking the Gospel of Fossil Fuels | Atlanta Black Star “They anticipated choosing us here in a predominantly Black area because they anticipated the least resistance. But they have received more resistance than they had anticipated.”

“They anticipated choosing us here in a predominantly Black area because they anticipated the least resistance. But they have received more resistance than they had anticipated.”

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She fought for her community as a Black Panther. Will gentrification force her out? | The Guardian In America’s ‘hottest housing market’, one woman’s fight to keep her home has become a rallying cry against the displacement of communities of color

In America’s ‘hottest housing market’, one woman’s fight to keep her home has become a rallying cry against the displacement of communities of color.

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