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What Martin Luther King Sr. Wrote About His Son’s Death | Time

In April 1968, my sons went to Memphis to help organize a struggle by the city’s sanitation workers to achieve better wages and working conditions. I wondered about M.L.’s involvement in this, whether or not he was spreading his concerns and his energies too thin. But again he was right. reside online and are fully searchable There could be no real separation between exploiting a man because of his color and taking advantage of his economic condition to control him politically. Exploitation didn’t need to be seen only in terms of segregation. It involved all people, white and black, in […]

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KKK Bombs Alabama Home of Civil Rights Leader Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth | Equal Justice Initiative

On December 25, 1956, Ku Klux Klan members in Alabama bombed the home of civil rights activist Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth. Shuttlesworth was home at the time of the bombing with his family and two members of Bethel Baptist Church, where he served as pastor. The 16-stick dynamite blast destroyed the home and caused damage to Shuttlesworth’s church next door but no one inside the home suffered serious injury. White supremacists would attempt to murder Shuttlesworth four more times in the next seven years. In an attack in 1957, a white mob brutally beat Shuttlesworth with chains and bats and stabbed […]

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Richard and Mildred Loving Plead Guilty to Marrying Interracially | Equal Justice Initiative

After marrying in Washington, D.C., in 1958, Richard and Mildred Loving returned to their native Caroline County, Virginia, to build a home and start a family. Their union was a criminal act in Virginia because Richard was white, Mildred was black, and the state’s Racial Integrity Act, passed in 1924, criminalized interracial marriage. Caroline County police arrested the Lovings in their home in an early morning raid and took them to jail. They were charged with marrying interracially out of state and then returning to reside in Virginia. “Miscegenation,” a felony, carried a penalty of up to five years in […]

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Exploding Myths About ‘Black Power, Jewish Politics’ | NPR

Many Americans tell the story of Black-Jewish political relations like this: First, there was the Civil Rights movement, where the two groups got along great. This was the mid-1950s to the mid-60s — picture Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. marching arm-in-arm from Selma to Montgomery. And James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, murdered while organizing to register black voters in Mississippi. Then, the story goes, there was a shift. In the mid-’60s, with the rise of black nationalism (and what some describe as black anti-Semitism), “the once wonderful alliance dissolved and split. And since […]

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Pardons for the Wilmington 10 | The New York Times

Before leaving office next month, Gov. Bev Perdue of North Carolina should finally pardon the Wilmington 10, a group of civil rights activists who were falsely convicted and imprisoned in connection with a racial disturbance in the city of Wilmington more than 40 years ago. The convictions, based on flimsy evidence and perjured testimony, were overturned by a federal court in 1980. But by then, the lives of the convicted had been broken on the wheel of Jim Crow justice. Wilmington was experiencing a bitter civil rights struggle in 1971 when a white-owned grocery store in a black neighborhood was […]

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Africa makes a scene: Best contemporary art fairs of 2020 | Al Jazeera

From South Africa to Morocco, fairs including new and established creatives are drawing art lovers and buyers alike. African art has been having a very long moment. Over the past 10 years, contemporary artists from the continent – from the Ghanaian sculptor El Anatsui to Kenyan artist Wangechi Mutu to South African photographer Zanele Muholi – have continued to build their names on the international stage. African artists have been presenting in major museums and galleries across Europe and the United States, while increasing numbers of African countries have shown at the prestigious Venice Biennale, including Ghana’s critically-acclaimed debut this […]

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Unita Blackwell Risked It All So Black Mississippians Could Vote | The New York Times Magazine

She was arrested dozens of times, and Klan members threw Molotov cocktails into her yard — but that didn’t stop her fight for civil rights. On an afternoon thick with Mississippi heat, Unita Blackwell sat on the front porch of her shotgun house with her friend Coreen, drinking homemade beer, waiting for something to happen. That’s when she saw them: two men — they looked to be about 19 — heading toward town. Blackwell knew they weren’t from around there. They walked too fast. No one walked fast in Mayersville on 90-degree days. They said, “Hello,” instead of the usual, […]

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Alabama unveils statue of civil rights icon Rosa Parks | AP News

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — A new statue of civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks was dedicated in Alabama’s capital city on Sunday, the 64th anniversary of her historic refusal to give up her seat on a public bus to a white man. Montgomery Mayor Steven Reed and Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey pulled back a cloth to unveil the statue before a crowd of about 400 spectators. The ceremony coincided with the anniversary of Parks’ Dec. 1, 1955 arrest that sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a pivotal part of the civil rights movement. “This depiction will inspire future generations to make the […]

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Juanita Abernathy, civil rights icon, dies | AJC

Rosalind Bentley, Ernie Suggs, AJC In this April 18, 1963 file photo, Coretta Scott King, left, the Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth, center, and Mrs. Juanita Abernathy, leave Birmingham jail after visiting Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rev. Dr. Ralph Abernathy in Birmingham, Ala. Juanita Abernathy, who wrote the business plan for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and took other influential steps in helping to build the American civil rights movement, has died. She was 88. Family spokesman James Peterson confirmed Abernathy died Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, at Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta following complications from a stroke. (File/Associated Press). Featured […]

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Baxter Leach, key member of Memphis’s striking sanitation workers, dies at 79 | The Washington Post

Adrian Sainz, The Washington Post Former sanitation worker Baxter Leach, 78, also did mechanic work and picked cotton to help make ends meet. Yalonda M. James / The Commercial Appeal. Featured Image Leach, a prominent member of the Memphis sanitation workers union whose historic strike drew the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. to the city where he was assassinated, died Aug. 27 in Memphis. He was 79. A friend, Calvin Taylor, said Mr. Leach had been hospitalized with cancer. Mr. Leach helped organize the 1968 strike in which 1,300 sanitation workers walked off the job and marched on Memphis streets […]

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