Press Enter / Return to begin your search.

Maj Christina Hopper Conquered Race, Gender, And The F-16 | Task & Purpose

Maj. Christina Hopper’s family is about as military as it gets. The legacy of service in her family made being a military brat a key part of her identity. Born in Norway while both her parents were stationed there with the Air Force, Hopper didn’t move to the United States until she was 4 years old. Her trajectory, following in her parents’ footsteps to the military, was normal, expected almost. But Hopper’s story deviates from the typical military brat-turned service member in that she didn’t only join the Air Force, she became the first black female pilot to fly a […]

Read More

Tuskegee Airman Leslie Edwards dies at Cincinnati VA Hospital | WCPO

WCPO staff, WCPO Leslie Edwards, 93, of Springfield Township, is a Tuskegee Airman who served as a mechanic during World War II. (Photo: The Enquirer/Liz Dufour). Featured Image eslie Edwards didn’t talk about his military career during his daughter’s childhood — or her adulthood, for that matter. Imogene Bowers was 50 years old when she learned that her small, slight father had been one of the Tuskegee Airmen, the first black military aviators in United States history. “He did not allow any of the focus to be on him,” she said Tuesday night. “Even when you talked about the Tuskegee […]

Read More

Documentary to tell story of all-black Army unit that protected Hawaii in WWII | Hawaii News Now

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – During World War II, the 369th Antiaircraft Artillery Regiment made up entirely of African-American soldiers was stationed in Hawaii. The troops hailed from New York and were known as the Harlem Rattlers. “I think it is a human interest story,” Monmouth University professor Nancy Mezey said. Mezey is part of a team researching and documenting the story of the segregated unit, and the little-known fact that it helped guard Hawaii in the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Jim Mendoza,Hawaii News Now Gwendolynn Brooks, 1950. Bettmann / Getty Images. Full article @ Hawaii News Now Share […]

Read More

Air Force’s newest aircraft named T-7A Red Hawk in honor of Tuskegee Airmen | ABC News

Elizabeth McLaughlin, ABC News he Air Force’s newest aircraft honors the legacy of the legendary Tuskegee Airmen, the nation’s first squadron of African American pilots who flew combat missions during World War II. Acting Secretary of the Air Force Matthew Donovan announced on Monday that the service’s advanced trainer aircraft, the T-X, has officially been named the T-7A Red Hawk. The aircraft will feature a distinctive red tail that pays tribute to the signature red tails painted on the Tuskegee airmen’s planes 75 years ago. One of the last surviving Tuskegee Airmen, retired Col. Charles McGee, was on stage at […]

Read More

Dr. Granville Coggs of San Antonio was Tuskegee Airman and Renaissance man | My San Antonio

Vincent Davis, My San Antonio Photo: EDWARD A. ORNELAS, STAFF / SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS, Featured Image wasn’t a challenge from which Dr. Granville Coleridge Coggs ever walked away. During World War II, when the U.S. military was racially segregated, Coggs, the grandson of slaves, completed pilot training to become one of the fabled Tuskegee Airmen. He graduated from Harvard Medical School to become a radiologist, and later invented a precision probe to help doctors locate cancer during breast screenings. For years, Coggs rose at 4 a.m. to swim laps in the pool at his Northwest. Side home. He sprinted for […]

Read More

General’s family: From segregation to command in 100 years | AP

Christina L. Myers, AP In this Feb. 9, 2019 photo, Brig. Gen. Milford H. Beagle, Jr. commanding general of Fort Jackson, speaks to the president of the Sgt. Isaac Woodard Historical Marker Association following the dedication ceremony in Batesburg-Leesville, S.C. Beagle, Jr. who now leads the Army’s Fort Jackson in South Carolina is descended from a soldier who served there in a segregated military more than a century ago. (AP Photo/Christina Myers). Featured Image , S.C. (AP) — Pvt. Walter Beagles arrived at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, in 1918, an African American draftee in a segregated Army that relegated black […]

Read More

These Photos of a Segregated U.S. Navy Unit Were Lost for Decades. They Still Have a Story to Tell | Time

John Edwin Mason, Time Photographs by Wayne Miller—Magnum Photos. Featured Image are many ways to photograph a black person, and it’s easy for things to go horribly wrong. America’s long history of racist imagery makes that quite clear. Wayne Miller, a white man, was notable for doing it right. In the mid-20th century, a time when American visual culture was suffused with photographs that reinforced demeaning notions about black people, Miller created deeply empathetic images with a understated, yet unmistakable anti-racist intent. He made his best known photographs of African Americans on Chicago’s South Side, between 1946 and 1948. But […]

Read More

Richard Overton, World War II veteran and America’s oldest man, dies at 112 | The Washington Post Richard Overton was in his mid-30s when he began serving in World War II. It was perhaps the most important thing he did with his life, but it was far from the last.

Richard Overton was in his mid-30s when he began serving in World War II. It was perhaps the most important thing he did with his life, but it was far from the last.

Read More

At 98, the Army Just Made Him an Officer: A Tale of Racial Bias in World War II | The New York Times “Decades have gone by and there hadn’t been a measure of basic fairness, of basic justice that was brought to bear,”... “We owe him this commission.”

“Decades have gone by and there hadn’t been a measure of basic fairness, of basic justice that was brought to bear,”… “We owe him this commission.”

Read More