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Azellia White, trailblazer for African American women in aviation, dies at 106 | The Washington Post

Azellia White, who said she found freedom in the skies, becoming one of the first African American women to earn a pilot’s license in the United States, died Sept. 14 at a nursing home in Sugar Land, Tex. She was 106. Her death was reported Nov. 18 in the London Daily Telegraph but had previously gone largely unnoted in the U.S. and international news media. A great-niece, Emeldia Bailey, confirmed her death and said she did not know the cause. Mrs. White, the daughter of a sharecropper and a midwife, was drawn to aviation by her husband, Hulon “Pappy” White, […]

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He Survived A Near-Lynching. 50 Years Later, He’s Still Healing | NPR, Morning Edition

It was 1965 when Winfred Rembert, then 19, says he was almost killed by a group of white men. “I’m 71. But I still wake up screaming and reliving things that happened to me,” Winfred, now 73, said. During a 2017 StoryCorps interview, Winfred told his wife, Patsy Rembert, 67, about the traumatic incident he’s still grappling with today. It all started in the aftermath of a civil rights protest that Winfred attended in Americus, Ga., in the 1960s. During the protest he got separated from the other demonstrators, and found himself being followed down an alleyway by two white […]

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N.J. sending teachers to visit trans-Atlantic slave sites to teach black history in public schools | The Philadelphia Inquirer

New Jersey public school teachers will get to travel to trans-Atlantic sites associated with the slave trade to learn how to better teach black history — not just in February but year-round — to comply with a decades-old state mandate. The initiative was announced Friday as a new program under the state’s Amistad law, which requires all public schools to teach African American history. The mandate was established under a 2002 law signed by then-Gov. Jim McGreevey but has not been widely implemented. It was the brainchild of Jacqui Greadington, a retired East Orange music teacher turned activist who wants […]

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What the ‘Father of Black History’ Would Have Actually Wanted Americans to Do for Black History Month | Time

Olivia B Waxman, Time Carter G. Woodson, the “father of black history.” Image: Library of Congress. Featured Image official theme of Black History Month 2019, “Black Migrations,” is a fitting one: not only is migration one of today’s most pressing political issues, but it’s also a key part of the annual observance’s own history. Black History Month’s roots can be traced to the Great Migration of the early 20th century, during which millions of African Americans from the South moved to the northern cities hoping for better job opportunities. In 1918, Carter G. Woodson published his book A Century of […]

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