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Barry Jenkins and Kahlil Joseph Reimagine Roy DeCarava’s Admiring Vision of Harlem | Hyperallergic Director Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk and video artist Kahlil Joseph’s “Fly Paper” transmute the aesthetics and storytelling of photographer Roy DeCarava’s 1950s portraits of Harlem.

Director Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk and video artist Kahlil Joseph’s “Fly Paper” transmute the aesthetics and storytelling of photographer Roy DeCarava’s 1950s portraits of Harlem.

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Netflix To Distribute Spike Lee-Produced Film ‘See You Yesterday’ | Deadline Netflix has come aboard to distribute See You Yesterday, a travel drama produced by Spike Lee’s 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks. The pic is the directorial debut from Stefon Bristol, Lee’s long-time NYU Graduate Film School protege.

Netflix has come aboard to distribute See You Yesterday, a travel drama produced by Spike Lee’s 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks. The pic is the directorial debut from Stefon Bristol, Lee’s long-time NYU Graduate Film School protege.

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Film About Free Black Women Millionaires In The 1800s Coming To Screen | Madame Noire

Veronica Wells , Madame Noire of the criticisms we’ve had about period pieces that center Black people is the fact that so many of the stories center around slavery, struggle and subservience. But a new film seeks to do something different. The play The House That Will Not Stand, is becoming a film. The play, inspired partially by The House of Bernarda Alba is about free, Black Creole women who became millionaires in New Orleans during the 1800s, despite slavery, sexism and more. The women find their fortunes through plaçage— the practice of common law marriages or civil unions between […]

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Restoration of Horace Jenkins’ African-American Romeo & Juliet to Premiere in New Orleans and DC | Roger Ebert.com A few years ago producer Sandra Schulberg told me a mesmerizing story about a film made by the late artist, Horace Jenkins, who died before it's theatrical release, and whose film lay lost for three decades.

A few years ago producer Sandra Schulberg told me a mesmerizing story about a film made by the late artist, Horace Jenkins, who died before it’s theatrical release, and whose film lay lost for three decades.

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From Birth of a Nation to BlacKkKlansman: Hollywood’s complex relationship with the KKK | The Guardian Spike Lee’s latest film, about a black detective infiltrating the Klan, once again raises the issue of how seriously cinema should take the white supremacist group

Spike Lee’s latest film, about a black detective infiltrating the Klan, once again raises the issue of how seriously cinema should take the white supremacist group.

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The Troubling Fate of a 1973 Film About the First Black Man in the C.I.A. | The New Yorker Ivan Dixon’s 1973 film, “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” which is playing at Metrograph from Friday through Sunday (it’s also on DVD and streaming), is a political fiction, based on a novel by Sam Greenlee, about the first black man in the C.I.A.

Ivan Dixon’s 1973 film, “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” which is playing at Metrograph from Friday through Sunday (it’s also on DVD and streaming), is a political fiction, based on a novel by Sam Greenlee, about the first black man in the C.I.A.

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