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Students Rally in Maryland’s Capital to Resolve Longstanding HBCU Lawsuit | Black Press USA

Students and alumni from Maryland’s four historically black colleges rallied near the state Capitol building in a call for a resolution to a 13-year-old federal lawsuit over disparities in academic programs. Individuals from Bowie State, Coppin, Morgan State, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore arrived early and filled the streets chanting and demanding that lawmakers and Gov. Larry Hogan settle the longstanding dispute. Inside the complex of government buildings, members of the Legislative Black Caucus of Maryland were urging lawmakers to stand behind a nearly $600 million settlement previously reached by the state and the Coalition for Equity and […]

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Impact and not optics: How we can increase the number of African Americans in medicine | The St. Louis American

I am the lead author of a peer-reviewed manuscript that details how U.S. medical school diversity initiatives are leaving us behind. This is a summary of the article, which was published in Academic Medicine, and a call to action to improve our representation and the health of our communities. U.S. medical education diversity initiatives were born out of the Civil Rights Movement in an effort to increase the representation of African Americans in the physician workforce. Over the last 50 years, these efforts have evolved to include other minority groups that are underrepresented in medicine, and efforts to specifically identify […]

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Nas Becomes ‘The Voice of Hennessy’ to Empower HBCU Students | Black Enterprise

Legendary hip-hop artist Nasir “Nas” Jones has teamed up with Hennessy and the Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) to uplift graduate students of color attending historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). The Queens-born rapper can be heard narrating a video promoting the Hennessy Fellows Program, a $10 million graduate scholarship initiative launched earlier this year to empower young African American leaders through financial assistance, access, and real-world work experience. “I’m proud to lend my voice to encourage enrollment in the Hennessy Fellows Program, a new graduate program created for students who want to blaze their own trails and pursue their […]

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History and African American studies faculty receive three-year UC-HBCU Pathways Grant | UCI News

Jessica Millward, UCI associate professor of history, and Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, UCI associate professor of African American studies, have received a three-year, $271,902 UC-HBCU Pathways Grant to partner with Morgan State University, a public and historically black research university in Baltimore. Administered by the UC Office of the President, the grants encourage UC faculty to actively engage in collaboration and cooperation with faculty and students at historically black colleges and universities to attract and retain graduate scholars who reflect the communities of the world. During the summers of 2020, 2021 and 2022, Millward and Willoughby-Herard will host four HBCU students on […]

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Is ‘Diversity’ Destroying The HBCUs? | Forbes

A new research brief from the Center for Minority Serving Institutions at Rutgers University asserts, “It can be argued that historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are experiencing a renaissance in terms of their enrollment of black students.” I found this startling, since for years HBCU enrollments have trended downward. Moreover, overall enrollments are in decline, so some further decline in HBCU enrollment is expected. The authors of the Rutgers study, Janelle Williams and Robert Palmer, hypothesize that increases in race-related incidents, which they call the “Missouri Effect” (after significant race-related protests at the University of Missouri) have led black […]

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Rediscovering “The Hampton Album,” a Renowned Record of African-American History After the Civil War | Feature Shoot

Credited as the first female photojournalist in the United States, Frances Benjamin Johnston (1864-1952) received a commission in 1899 to photograph the Hampton Institute, a private historically Black university located in Hampton, Virginia. Founded in 1868, just four years after the Civil War, the Hampton Institute was dedicated to the education of African-American men and women — and from 1878 to 1923, also maintained a program for Native Americans. The campus was located on the grounds of “Little Scotland,” a former plantation. Among its many illustrious alumni was no less than Booker T. Washington who taught at Hampton after he […]

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Too Many Black Students Aren’t Learning Their History in Schools | Education Post

ShaRhonda Knott-Dawson, Education Post hen I was in school, I was starved for information about who I really am. I ached to hear stories about people who look like me, or see the names of Black scholars in math or science, or even to talk about Africa, without talking about poverty and slavery. Today, too many Black schoolchildren are having the same experience. Too often, students’ first exposure to Black History occurs through the study of slavery. Too often, Africans are portrayed in schools as savage, barbaric people. Those who came to the Americas were “lucky” because they were saved […]

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The Changing Image of the Black in Children’s Literature | The Horn Book, Inc.

Augusta Baker, The Horn Book, Inc. The longtime couple have finally become engaged, celebrating with family and friends. (Image via NBC Chicago). Featured Image n the 1920’s and 1930’s, children’s books seemed to foster prejudice by planting false images in the minds of children. Most authors were white, with little knowledge about black life, and yet they wrote as if they were authorities. No wonder it was an accepted fact in children’s books that blacks were lazy, shiftless, lived in shanties, had nothing and wanted nothing, sang and laughed all day. Black writers for children were practically nonexistent, and the […]

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