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The Troubling Fate of a 1973 Film About the First Black Man in the C.I.A. (2018) | The New Yorker

Ivan Dixon’s “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” from 1973, displays the bedrock of racist attitudes and assumptions that renders racist policies both inescapable and irreparable. Ivan Dixon’s 1973 film, “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” which is playing at Metrograph from Friday through Sunday (it’s also on DVD and streaming), is a political fiction, based on a novel by Sam Greenlee, about the first black man in the C.I.A. After leaving the agency, the agent, Dan Freeman (Lawrence Cook) moves to Chicago, and puts his training in guerrilla warfare to use: he organizes a group of black […]

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Matthew Cherry’s ‘Hair Love’ Receives Well Deserved Oscar Nomination | Because of Them We Can

Hair Love, the popular children’s book turned animated short by former NFL player, Matthew Cherry, gets nominated for an Oscar, USA Today reports. We first wrote about Cherry and his budding animated short in 2017. The NFL player turned filmmaker was on a mission to highlight the relationship between Black fathers and daughters in a short film, inspired by viral videos of fathers doing their daughters’ hair. At the time, Cherry said that his focus was representation, and he wanted to make sure that Black fathers and their daughters were the focus in his film. “Media is impressionable and when […]

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DGA Award Nominations Acknowledge Existence of Female Directors | Vulture

The Directors Guild of America has announced its nominees for Best Feature Film Director of 2019, and many of them are women — or at least many of them in the First-Time Feature Film Director category are women. Atlantics’ Mati Diop, Honey Boy’s Alma Har’el, and Queen & Slim’s Melina Matsoukas all received nominations. The main award category still has an entirely male roster of nominees, but even so! After a Golden Globes ceremony that excluded this year’s many female directors, the First-Time DGA category suggests a positive step forward. Also worth noting for anyone making Oscar predictions: no Todd […]

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Reading ‘Us’ Through Its T-shirts | The New York Times

With its star, Lupita Nyong’o, in awards contention this season, a look at the clothes that helped tell the story. You could watch Jordan Peele’s “Us” a dozen times and still not catch all of the symbolism, references and ideas tucked in it. Yes, scissors are clearly a thing, but what’s with that tuxedo T-shirt? The movie, ostensibly about a family, the Wilsons, hunted by its doppelgängers, is something of an awards contender. Its star, Lupita Nyong’o, is up for a Screen Actors Guild Award on Jan. 19 for her haunting portrayal of a mother with a painful past and […]

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Exclusive: Erika Alexander Talks Black Women In Hollywood & Paving Your Own Way | xoNecole

There are several iconic black leading ladies many of us grew to love and sought to emulate in the 90s. My favorite femme fatale during that time was a lawyer by trade, called a Brooklyn brownstone home, and had three homegirls standing to her left and her right who held her down through the ups and downs of being a single, sex-positive power woman in the Big Apple. Maxine Shaw’s brash humor, chic box-braided undercut, love of food, and sassy confidence drew audiences closer and closer to the TV every week, providing a unique depiction of femininity and ambition that […]

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‘Juju’: Three Black Women Learn They’re Descendants Of Yoruba Witches In New Fantasy Web Series | Shadow And Act

When the witch-centric series Siempre Bruja premiered on Netflix in February, it garnered a large amount of criticism on Twitter for its premise: A time-traveling Afro-Colombian witch goes to the 21st-century at the behest of a wizard who promises to save the life of her lover–a white man who turns out to be her slaveholder’s son. Black witches often receive the short end of the stick in fantasy television. They are usually sidekicks who aid the white lead with relatively little to no backstory. The combined viewer frustration from Siempre Bruja begged the question: When will we get a show […]

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‘The Wire’ actor to attend Harrisburg’s first African-American film festival | Penn Live

Sankofa African American Theater Company will host a special guest as they prepare for the region’s first African-American film festival. The 2019 Sankofa Film Festival will be held on Dec. 27 at the State Museum in Harrisburg. Actor Michael K. Williams, famous for his role as Omar Little in the hit HBO series “The Wire,” is planned to make an appearance at the festival. Williams is also known for roles in films such as “The Road,” “12 Years a Slave,” “Assassin’s Creed” and “Motherless Brooklyn,” and for appearances on television series including “Community” and “Boardwalk Empire.” Sean Adams, Penn Live […]

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‘Queen and Slim’ Director Melina Matsoukas Inks First-Look Deal at FX | Variety

Director Melina Matsoukas has signed a first-look deal with FX Productions. Under the deal, Matsoukas will develop new content for FX Networks. She recently directed the pilot for the upcoming FX series “Y,” based on the graphic novel series “Y: The Last Man.” Matsoukas will also serve as an executive producer on the series. Her feature directorial debut, “Queen and Slim” starring Daniel Kaluuya and Jodie Turner-Smith, will debut in theaters on Nov. 27. “Melina is an enormously talented director and producer,” said Nick Grad, co-president of original programming for FX Entertainment. “We’re especially excited that Melina has such a […]

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