Tag: Barry Jenkins

Barry Jenkins to Direct Alvin Ailey Biopic | Variety

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Stephanie Farr, Variety CREDIT: MAARTEN DE BOER. Featured Image writer-director Barry Jenkins will direct a biopic about iconic choreographer Alvin Ailey. Fox Searchlight first announced the project in March 2018, saying it had the support of the Ailey Organization. Singer-songwriter Alicia Keys is producing with Susan Lewis through her AK Worldwide production company, along with Judy Kinberg, Rachel Cohen and […]
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Regina King and Colman Domingo Make Us Better With ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ | Colorlines The veteran actors discuss their relationships to James Baldwin, what they brought to their portrayal of Sharon and Joe Rivers and the passion for rich Black characters.">Regina King and Colman Domingo Make Us Better With ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ | Colorlines The veteran actors discuss their relationships to James Baldwin, what they brought to their portrayal of Sharon and Joe Rivers and the passion for rich Black characters.

Regina King, Colman Domingo, If Beale Could Talk, Barry Jenkins, James Baldwin, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue
The veteran actors discuss their relationships to James Baldwin, what they brought to their portrayal of Sharon and Joe Rivers and the passion for rich Black characters.
Regina King and Colman Domingo Make Us Better With ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ | Colorlines The veteran actors discuss their relationships to James Baldwin, what they brought to their portrayal of Sharon and Joe Rivers and the passion for rich Black characters." class="btn btn-sm btn-link"> Read More

If Beale Street Could Talk and the Urgency of Black Love | The Atlantic Barry Jenkins’s adaptation of the 1974 James Baldwin novel homes in on the familial tenderness that buoys the youthful protagonists amid devastatingly common injustices.">If Beale Street Could Talk and the Urgency of Black Love | The Atlantic Barry Jenkins’s adaptation of the 1974 James Baldwin novel homes in on the familial tenderness that buoys the youthful protagonists amid devastatingly common injustices.

If Beale Street Could Talk, James Baldwin, African American Film, Black Film, African American Cinema, Black Cinema, African American Literature, Black Literature, African American Author, Black Author, Barry Jenkins, Moonlight, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue
Barry Jenkins’s adaptation of the 1974 James Baldwin novel homes in on the familial tenderness that buoys the youthful protagonists amid devastatingly common injustices.
If Beale Street Could Talk and the Urgency of Black Love | The Atlantic Barry Jenkins’s adaptation of the 1974 James Baldwin novel homes in on the familial tenderness that buoys the youthful protagonists amid devastatingly common injustices." class="btn btn-sm btn-link"> Read More

Barry Jenkins and Kahlil Joseph Reimagine Roy DeCarava’s Admiring Vision of Harlem | Hyperallergic Director Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk and video artist Kahlil Joseph’s “Fly Paper” transmute the aesthetics and storytelling of photographer Roy DeCarava’s 1950s portraits of Harlem.">Barry Jenkins and Kahlil Joseph Reimagine Roy DeCarava’s Admiring Vision of Harlem | Hyperallergic Director Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk and video artist Kahlil Joseph’s “Fly Paper” transmute the aesthetics and storytelling of photographer Roy DeCarava’s 1950s portraits of Harlem.

Barry Jenkins, Kahlil Joseph, Harlem, If Beale Street Could Talk, James Baldwin, Historic Harlem, Fly Paper, Roy DeCarava, African American Art, Black Art, African American Cinema, Black Cinema, African American Film, Black Film, African American Movies, Black Movies, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue
Director Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk and video artist Kahlil Joseph’s “Fly Paper” transmute the aesthetics and storytelling of photographer Roy DeCarava’s 1950s portraits of Harlem.
Barry Jenkins and Kahlil Joseph Reimagine Roy DeCarava’s Admiring Vision of Harlem | Hyperallergic Director Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk and video artist Kahlil Joseph’s “Fly Paper” transmute the aesthetics and storytelling of photographer Roy DeCarava’s 1950s portraits of Harlem." class="btn btn-sm btn-link"> Read More

Barry Jenkins to Hollywood: Adapt More Black Literature | Colorlines The “If Beale Street Could Talk” director discusses the importance of the Black literary canon to the film industry.">Barry Jenkins to Hollywood: Adapt More Black Literature | Colorlines The “If Beale Street Could Talk” director discusses the importance of the Black literary canon to the film industry.

African American Literature, Black Literature, Barry Jenkins, Black Hollywood, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, Willoughby Avenue
The “If Beale Street Could Talk” director discusses the importance of the Black literary canon to the film industry.
Barry Jenkins to Hollywood: Adapt More Black Literature | Colorlines The “If Beale Street Could Talk” director discusses the importance of the Black literary canon to the film industry." class="btn btn-sm btn-link"> Read More

Angela Flournoy on Barry Jenkins: 3 Must-Read Passages | Colorlines The celebrated novelist profiled the Oscar-winning filmmaker ahead of the November release of his upcoming film, “If Beale Street Could Talk.”">Angela Flournoy on Barry Jenkins: 3 Must-Read Passages | Colorlines The celebrated novelist profiled the Oscar-winning filmmaker ahead of the November release of his upcoming film, “If Beale Street Could Talk.”

Angela Flournoy, Barry Jenkins, African American Film, African American Movie, Black Movie, James Baldwin, If Beale Street Could Talk, Beale Street, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDRD
The celebrated novelist profiled the Oscar-winning filmmaker ahead of the November release of his upcoming film, “If Beale Street Could Talk.”
Angela Flournoy on Barry Jenkins: 3 Must-Read Passages | Colorlines The celebrated novelist profiled the Oscar-winning filmmaker ahead of the November release of his upcoming film, “If Beale Street Could Talk.”" class="btn btn-sm btn-link"> Read More

Watch the Emotional First Trailer for Barry Jenkins’s New Film ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ | Vice The 'Moonlight' director is making his return to the big screen with an adaptation of James Baldwin's 1974 novel.">Watch the Emotional First Trailer for Barry Jenkins’s New Film ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ | Vice The 'Moonlight' director is making his return to the big screen with an adaptation of James Baldwin's 1974 novel.

African American Literature, Black Literature, African American Authors, Barry Jenkins, If Beale Street Could Talk, James Baldwin, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, The Five Fifths, Willoughby Avenue
The 'Moonlight' director is making his return to the big screen with an adaptation of James Baldwin's 1974 novel.
Watch the Emotional First Trailer for Barry Jenkins’s New Film ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ | Vice The 'Moonlight' director is making his return to the big screen with an adaptation of James Baldwin's 1974 novel." class="btn btn-sm btn-link"> Read More

Moonlight Director Barry Jenkins on What Scared Him Most About Making Such a Personal Film – Slate In advance of the Oscars this Sunday, where Moonlight is up for eight awards including Best Picture, we're reprinting this conversation from October 2016 between the film's writer-director Barry Jenkins and Slate's Aisha Harris.">Moonlight Director Barry Jenkins on What Scared Him Most About Making Such a Personal Film – Slate In advance of the Oscars this Sunday, where Moonlight is up for eight awards including Best Picture, we're reprinting this conversation from October 2016 between the film's writer-director Barry Jenkins and Slate's Aisha Harris.

Moonlight, Barry Jenkins, Naomia Harris, Mahershala Ali, Janelle Monae, Alex Hibbert, Ashton Sanders, Trevante Rhodes, African American Films, Black Films, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN
In advance of the Oscars this Sunday, where Moonlight is up for eight awards including Best Picture, we're reprinting this conversation from October 2016 between the film's writer-director Barry Jenkins and Slate's Aisha Harris.
Moonlight Director Barry Jenkins on What Scared Him Most About Making Such a Personal Film – Slate In advance of the Oscars this Sunday, where Moonlight is up for eight awards including Best Picture, we're reprinting this conversation from October 2016 between the film's writer-director Barry Jenkins and Slate's Aisha Harris." class="btn btn-sm btn-link"> Read More

To describe “Moonlight,” Barry Jenkins’s second feature, as a movie about growing up poor, black and gay would be accurate enough.


It would also not be wrong to call it a movie about drug abuse, mass incarceration and school violence. But those classifications are also inadequate, so much as to be downright misleading. It would be truer to the mood and spirit of this breathtaking film to say that it’s about teaching a child to swim, about cooking a meal for an old friend, about the feeling of sand on skin and the sound of waves on a darkened beach, about first kisses and lingering regrets. Based on the play “In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue” by Tarell Alvin McCraney, “Moonlight” is both a disarmingly, at times almost unbearably personal film and an urgent social document, a hard look at American reality and a poem written in light, music and vivid human faces.

The stanzas consist of three chapters in the life of Chiron, played as a wide-eyed boy by Alex Hibbert, as a brooding adolescent by Ashton Sanders and as a mostly grown man by Trevante Rhodes. The nature and meaning of manhood is one of Mr. Jenkins’s chief concerns. How tough are you supposed to be? How cruel? How tender? How brave? And how are you supposed to learn?



Jenkins’s breakout film was Medicine for Melancholy, a low-budget independent feature released in 2008, starring Wyatt Cenac and Tracey Heggins. The film was well received by critics.

After the success of his previous film, Jenkins wrote an epic for Focus Features about “Stevie Wonder and time travel” and an adaptation to the James Baldwin novel If Beale Street Could Talk, both of which never entered production. He later worked as a carpenter and co-founded an advertising company called Strike Anywhere. In 2011, he wrote and directed Remigration, a sci-fi short film about gentrification. Jenkins became a writer for HBO’s The Leftovers, to which he commented, “I didn’t get to do much.”

Jenkins directed and wrote Moonlight, his first feature film in eight years. The film was shot in Miami and premiered at the Telluride Film Festival in 2016 to vast critical acclaim.

His upcoming projects include a series based on Colson Whitehead’s novel The Underground Railroad and a screenplay based on the life of Claressa Shields.


‘Moonlight’: Is This the Year’s Best Movie?