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$27 Million for Reparations Over Slave Ties Pledged by Seminary | The New York Times

The Princeton Theological Seminary said it was committed to “telling the truth” about its ties to slavery. Black students don’t think it goes far enough. A New Jersey seminary has pledged to spend $27 million on scholarships and other initiatives to address its historical ties to slavery, in what appears to be the biggest effort of its kind. The announcement, by the Princeton Theological Seminary on Friday, came about a year after an internal report detailed the findings of a two-year investigation that showed slavery’s deep roots in the school’s past. The move put the seminary at the heart of […]

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Op-Ed: California’s forgotten slave history | Los Angeles Times

Separated by just 60 miles along the I-10, Los Angeles and San Bernardino feel worlds apart. The former boasts some of the richest urban developments and residential pockets in the nation. The latter — a “broken city,” as this newspaper put it in 2015 — struggled through five years of bankruptcy and municipal dysfunction. But their roles in this California tale of two cities were once reversed. Before the Civil War, San Bernardino was the most prosperous and fastest-growing settlement in Southern California. San Bernardino’s early success rested on a pair of seemingly incongruous forces: Mormonism and slavery. In 1851, […]

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‘The Slaves Dread New Year’s Day the Worst’: The Grim History of January 1 | Time

Americans are likely to think of New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day as a time to celebrate the fresh start that a new year represents, but there is also a troubling side to the holiday’s history. In the years before the Civil War, the first day of the new year was often a heartbreaking one for enslaved people in the United States. In the African-American community, New Year’s Day used to be widely known as “Hiring Day” — or “Heartbreak Day,” as the African-American abolitionist journalist William Cooper Nell described it — because enslaved people spent New Year’s Eve […]

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Will America’s Universities Point The Way Towards Reparations For Slavery? | Forbes

Georgetown University recently announced that it plans to raise around $400,000 a year to pay for reparations. They would go to the descendants of enslaved people who were exploited by Jesuit plantations and who were eventually sold to bring revenue to the university. A number of other universities, including Princeton Theological Seminary, have also announced plans for reparations. The moral case for reparations is easy to grasp. It represents compensation for various harms that are legally recognized in other contexts such as wage theft, wrongful imprisonment, battery, and sexual assault among other things. And there is an argument that the […]

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Which black Americans should get reparations? | The Washington Post

Wesley Lowery, The Washington Post ‘Dramatic Social Change Requires Imagination’ – Prof. William “Sandy” Darity. Featured Image URHAM, N.C. — He’s been one of academia’s leading authorities on American racial inequity for years, in high demand by Democratic presidential candidates who hope he’ll endorse their proposals to close the “racial wealth gap” — a term that his research helped popularize. But as William “Sandy” Darity shuffles through papers in his second-floor office at Duke University, the gray-haired economist explained that he was hard at work on his own proposal, one that could be the most sweeping of his career — […]

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Despite pushback, Charleston historic sites expand their interpretation of slavery | The Post and Courier

Cedric ‘BIG CED’ Thornton, The Post and Courier A row of enslaved people’s homes are still present on McLeod Plantation Historic Site on Monday Aug. 26, 2019, in Charleston. Gavin McIntyre/ Staff. By Gavin McIntyre [email protected] Featured Image recent years, Charleston-area historic sites have dramatically increased their interpretation of slavery and its vital role in the area’s early history. And some visitors have pushed back, uneasy with hearing a story many feel reflects poorly on their ancestors. The feedback can be particularly harsh with the relative anonymity of social media and a political moment where racism is debated almost daily […]

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