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A 1970 Law Led to the Mass Sterilization of Native American Women. That History Still Matters | Time

Marie Sanchez, chief tribal judge on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation, arrived in Geneva in 1977 with a clear message to deliver to the United Nations Convention on Indigenous Rights. American Indian women, she argued, were targets of the “modern form” of genocide—sterilization. Over the six-year period that had followed the passage of the Family Planning Services and Population Research Act of 1970, physicians sterilized perhaps 25% of Native American women of childbearing age, and there is evidence suggesting that the numbers were actually even higher. Some of these procedures were performed under pressure or duress, or without the women’s knowledge […]

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US city to pay reparations to African-American community with tax on marijuana sales | The Telegraph

A city in Illinois has announced it will create a reparations fund for its African American community through a new tax on marijuana sales. Recreational use of the drug will become legal in the state from January and officials in Evanston, which is 12 miles north of Chicago, have voted to approve a 3 per cent tax on the sales to fund a local reparations programme. The tax is expected to generate between $500,000 and $750,000 annually for the reparations fund, which will be capped at $10 million over the next ten years. The city’s lawmakers will meet next week […]

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Red Summer, 100 years later: Its legacy of racial division and hate is buried in our demography | Daily Kos

The events of Red Summer are important to remember in part because they are representative of the kind of horror that lies within the history of being black in America, a horror most white Americans little understand or appreciate, reinforced by their often willful ignorance. However, these events all were noteworthy in another important regard: They represented the first time that black communities organized and resisted this violence, with varying degrees of success. But the pushback was just beginning, and eventually turned the tide. Lynchings continued at their usual pace through the next year or two, finally beginning their decline […]

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Azellia White, trailblazer for African American women in aviation, dies at 106 | The Washington Post

Azellia White, who said she found freedom in the skies, becoming one of the first African American women to earn a pilot’s license in the United States, died Sept. 14 at a nursing home in Sugar Land, Tex. She was 106. Her death was reported Nov. 18 in the London Daily Telegraph but had previously gone largely unnoted in the U.S. and international news media. A great-niece, Emeldia Bailey, confirmed her death and said she did not know the cause. Mrs. White, the daughter of a sharecropper and a midwife, was drawn to aviation by her husband, Hulon “Pappy” White, […]

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He Survived A Near-Lynching. 50 Years Later, He’s Still Healing | NPR, Morning Edition

It was 1965 when Winfred Rembert, then 19, says he was almost killed by a group of white men. “I’m 71. But I still wake up screaming and reliving things that happened to me,” Winfred, now 73, said. During a 2017 StoryCorps interview, Winfred told his wife, Patsy Rembert, 67, about the traumatic incident he’s still grappling with today. It all started in the aftermath of a civil rights protest that Winfred attended in Americus, Ga., in the 1960s. During the protest he got separated from the other demonstrators, and found himself being followed down an alleyway by two white […]

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