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From Glasgow to Tulsa: A Scot wrestles with his racial identity | The Scotsman

Martyn McLaughlin, The Scotsman The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921, during which white residents destroyed the prosperous black neighborhood of Greenwood, left as many as 300 people dead and 8,000 homeless. Credit Oklahoma Historical Society/Getty Images. Featured Image Early exposure to prejudice drove Eric Miller across the Atlantic to demand reparations for African American victims of Oklahoma’s infamous massacre, he tells Martyn McLaughlin. was the mixed race boy from Glasgow who wrestled with doubts and discrimination over his Scots-Caribbean heritage, only to grow into the man playing a leading role in the long and painful quest to deliver justice to […]

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‘The haunted houses’: Legacy of Nat Turner’s slave rebellion lingers, but reminders are disappearing The Washington Post

Greg Schneider, The Washington Post In this Monday, April 8, 2019 photo, the sword that is believed to have been carried by Nat Turner during his insurrection is seen in Courtland, Va. In 1831, a slave rebellion was led by Turner in Southampton County. He and and others from the insurrection were found guilty and hung. The Southampton County Historical Society is planning a free walking tour around Courtland that highlights historical spots in town, many of which involve Turner and the rebellion. (Matt McClain), Featured Image , Va. — Kids grow up in rural Southampton County hearing that the […]

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A brief history of the enduring phony science that perpetuates white supremacy | The Washington Post

Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post People explore the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post), Featured Image mysterious and chronic sickness had been afflicting slaves for years, working its way into their minds and causing them to flee from their plantations. Unknown in medical literature, its troubling symptoms were familiar to masters and overseers, especially in the South, where hundreds of enslaved people ran from captivity every year. On March 12, 1851, the noted physician Samuel A. Cartwright reported to the Medical Association of Louisiana that he had identified the malady […]

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The Bible was used to justify slavery. Then Africans made it their path to freedom. | The Washington Post

Julie Zauzmer, The Washington Post the Rev. Jaymes Robert Moody takes his pulpit to preach, sometimes he pictures the graveyard — that is where his congregation was born. It was called Georgia Cemetery, named, he has been told, for the place the enslaved were stolen from before being sent to work the fields in Huntsville, Ala. The graveyard was where they buried their loved ones. It was there they could gather in private. It was there where they could worship a God who offered not only salvation, but the thing they sought most — the promise of freedom. That graveyard, […]

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