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Canada’s first and only all-black battalion honoured with special stamp | Global News

Canada Post unveiled a limited edition stamp in Cherrybrook, N.S. on Tuesday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of black men who formed a segregated unit and fought during the First World War. The company said the stamp is a chance to honour the contributions of black Canadians. “This stamp honours men who stepped forward to serve this country in uniform but were denied the opportunity to fight,” said Jim Dunsworth, director of operations for Canada Post. Natasha Pace, Global News Full article @ Global News Share This +FacebookTwitterMail

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Maj Christina Hopper Conquered Race, Gender, And The F-16 | Task & Purpose

Maj. Christina Hopper’s family is about as military as it gets. The legacy of service in her family made being a military brat a key part of her identity. Born in Norway while both her parents were stationed there with the Air Force, Hopper didn’t move to the United States until she was 4 years old. Her trajectory, following in her parents’ footsteps to the military, was normal, expected almost. But Hopper’s story deviates from the typical military brat-turned service member in that she didn’t only join the Air Force, she became the first black female pilot to fly a […]

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Tuskegee Airman Leslie Edwards dies at Cincinnati VA Hospital | WCPO

WCPO staff, WCPO Leslie Edwards, 93, of Springfield Township, is a Tuskegee Airman who served as a mechanic during World War II. (Photo: The Enquirer/Liz Dufour). Featured Image eslie Edwards didn’t talk about his military career during his daughter’s childhood — or her adulthood, for that matter. Imogene Bowers was 50 years old when she learned that her small, slight father had been one of the Tuskegee Airmen, the first black military aviators in United States history. “He did not allow any of the focus to be on him,” she said Tuesday night. “Even when you talked about the Tuskegee […]

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Documentary to tell story of all-black Army unit that protected Hawaii in WWII | Hawaii News Now

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – During World War II, the 369th Antiaircraft Artillery Regiment made up entirely of African-American soldiers was stationed in Hawaii. The troops hailed from New York and were known as the Harlem Rattlers. “I think it is a human interest story,” Monmouth University professor Nancy Mezey said. Mezey is part of a team researching and documenting the story of the segregated unit, and the little-known fact that it helped guard Hawaii in the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Jim Mendoza,Hawaii News Now Gwendolynn Brooks, 1950. Bettmann / Getty Images. Full article @ Hawaii News Now Share […]

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World War II veteran calls honorable discharge from Army to correct an ‘injustice’ nearly 75 years later ‘a miracle’ | Chicago Tribune

PHILADELPHIA World War II veteran Nelson Henry Jr. never thought he would see the day the Army would correct his discharge nearly 75 years after he was forced to leave the military because of the color of his skin. Henry, 95, of Philadelphia, received word Monday from the Army Correction of Military Records office that his discriminatory “blue discharge” from 1945 because he was black has been changed to honorable. He called the unanimous decision by a three-member board a miracle. “It’s unbelievable. I’m still wondering if it’s a dream,” Henry said in an interview Tuesday in his Logan Square […]

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Dr. Granville Coggs of San Antonio was Tuskegee Airman and Renaissance man | My San Antonio

Vincent Davis, My San Antonio Photo: EDWARD A. ORNELAS, STAFF / SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS, Featured Image wasn’t a challenge from which Dr. Granville Coleridge Coggs ever walked away. During World War II, when the U.S. military was racially segregated, Coggs, the grandson of slaves, completed pilot training to become one of the fabled Tuskegee Airmen. He graduated from Harvard Medical School to become a radiologist, and later invented a precision probe to help doctors locate cancer during breast screenings. For years, Coggs rose at 4 a.m. to swim laps in the pool at his Northwest. Side home. He sprinted for […]

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West Point gets 1st black superintendent in 216-year history | Army Times

The Associated Press, Army Times POINT, N.Y. — Lt. Gen. Darryl A. Williams, a 1983 U.S. Military Academy graduate who has held high-ranking Army posts in Europe and Asia, will become the first black officer to command West Point in its 216-year history, academy officials announced Friday. Williams will assume command as the academy’s 60th superintendent during a ceremony Monday morning in West Point’s Jefferson Hall, school officials said. The native of Alexandria, Virginia, has served as the deputy chief of staff for the U.S. Army in Europe and the deputy commanding general for support for the 2nd Infantry Division […]

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General’s family: From segregation to command in 100 years | AP

Christina L. Myers, AP In this Feb. 9, 2019 photo, Brig. Gen. Milford H. Beagle, Jr. commanding general of Fort Jackson, speaks to the president of the Sgt. Isaac Woodard Historical Marker Association following the dedication ceremony in Batesburg-Leesville, S.C. Beagle, Jr. who now leads the Army’s Fort Jackson in South Carolina is descended from a soldier who served there in a segregated military more than a century ago. (AP Photo/Christina Myers). Featured Image , S.C. (AP) — Pvt. Walter Beagles arrived at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, in 1918, an African American draftee in a segregated Army that relegated black […]

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Frank E. Petersen, First Black General in Marines, Dies at 83 | The New York Times (2015) Frank E. Petersen Jr., who suffered bruising racial indignities as a military enlistee in the 1950s and was even arrested at an officers’ club on suspicion of impersonating a lieutenant, but who endured to become the first black aviator and the first black general in the Marine Corps, died on Tuesday at his home in Stevensville, Md., near Annapolis. He was 83.

Frank E. Petersen Jr., who suffered bruising racial indignities as a military enlistee in the 1950s and was even arrested at an officers’ club on suspicion of impersonating a lieutenant, but who endured to become the first black aviator and the first black general in the Marine Corps, died on Tuesday at his home in Stevensville, Md., near Annapolis. He was 83.

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