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The Black Girls Cheer Movement Empowers Young Cheerleaders of Color | Black Enterprise

A movement to empower young black girls is gaining momentum, according to ABC News, thanks to Black Girls Cheer. Sharita Richardson was and still is fond of cheerleading, a lifelong passion. The woman with roots in North Carolina started cheerleading in middle school. As a mother, she raised three daughters who cheered competitively. In 2014, Richardson took a different perspective of cheerleading as a doctoral student. “Someone said the best thing to do your dissertation on is something you know a lot about, and I was kind of lost because I didn’t really know a lot about anything besides cheerleading. […]

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Meet Melissa Harville-Lebron: The First Black Woman to Own a NASCAR Team | Black Enterprise (2018)

Melissa Harville-Lebron never imagined that her entrepreneurial pursuits and ambitions would lead her to make history as the first African American woman to solely own a race team licensed by NASCAR. Harville-Lebron, a 47-year-old single mother raising her three biological children as well as her siblings’ four kids, started her career in the entertainment industry as an intern at Sony Music. In 2005, she launched her own music label while working for New York City’s Department of Correction office. Nearly a decade later, she suffered from a severe asthma attack that forced her into early retirement and inspired her to […]

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Cancel The World Series, Simone Biles’s First Pitch Just Won Everything | ELLE

Mere weeks after becoming the most decorated gymnast in all of history ever—male or female—Simone Biles was not content to lie low and revel in her success. Instead she stopped by Game 2 of the World Series in Houston on October 23 to throw out a groundbreaking first pitch. In the clip, Biles completes a back flip and a twist before ever even tossing the ball in Houston Astros outfielder Jake Marisnick’s direction. The crowd loses their minds (as we all would) before the Olympic Gold medalist’s pitch seamlessly meets Marisnick’s glove. After catching the ball, the player signs it […]

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Black U.S. Olympians Won In Nazi Germany Only To Be Overlooked At Home | NPR

Eighty years ago this month, the United States competed in the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games in Nazi Germany, with 18 African-American athletes part of the U.S. squad. Track star Jesse Owens, one of the greatest Olympians of all time, won four gold medals. What the 17 other African-American Olympians did in Berlin, though, has largely been forgotten — and so too has their rough return home to racial segregation. “Determination! That’s what it takes,” one of the athletes, John Woodruff, said during a 1996 oral history interview for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. “A lot of fire in the stomach!” […]

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The Forgotten All-Star Game That Helped Integrate Baseball | Deadspin

Stephanie Liscio, Deadspin The 1939 East-West All-Star Game in Chicago. Photo: Getty. Featured Image Cleveland celebrated its sixth time hosting MLB’s All-Star Game last week, it might have seemed an odd event to commemorate baseball’s integration. But when Jackie Robinson stepped onto the field in a Brooklyn Dodgers uniform in April of 1947, becoming the first African-American to play in white organized baseball since the 19th century, it was the culmination of years of work by activists to integrate Major League Baseball. And one of the earliest battlegrounds for integration was a Negro Leagues all-star contest in Cleveland in 1942. […]

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Before Kaepernick, The ‘Syracuse 8’ Were Blackballed By Pro Football | WBUR

Karen Given and, Shira Springer, WBUR Members of the Syracuse University football team boycotted the 1970 season because of racial discrimination. (Courtesy Syracuse 8). Featured Image met in secret, away from their white coaches and teammates. “We used to meet at midnight,” former Syracuse football player Dana Harrell says. “And we could have met earlier. But we used to meet at midnight, to lay out our thoughts and plans, just like the slaves.” Harrell was one of nine college football players the international media would — incorrectly — call the “Syracuse 8.” It was the late 1960s, after the assassinations […]

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Meadowlark Lemon Dies at 83; Harlem Globetrotters’ Dazzling Court Jester | The New York Times

Bruce Weber, The New York Times Meadowlark Lemon of the Harlem Globetrotters during play against the Boston Shamrocks at Madison Square Garden in 1973. Librado Romero/The New York Times, Featured Image Lemon, whose halfcourt hook shots, no-look behind-the-back passes and vivid clowning were marquee features of the feel-good traveling basketball show known as the Harlem Globetrotters for nearly a quarter-century, died on Sunday in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 83. His death was confirmed by his wife, Cynthia Lemon, who did not specify the cause. A gifted athlete with an entertainer’s hunger for the spotlight, Lemon, who dreamed of playing for […]

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