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Canada’s first and only all-black battalion honoured with special stamp | Global News

Canada Post unveiled a limited edition stamp in Cherrybrook, N.S. on Tuesday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of black men who formed a segregated unit and fought during the First World War. The company said the stamp is a chance to honour the contributions of black Canadians. “This stamp honours men who stepped forward to serve this country in uniform but were denied the opportunity to fight,” said Jim Dunsworth, director of operations for Canada Post. Natasha Pace, Global News Full article @ Global News Share This +FacebookTwitterMail

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Maj Christina Hopper Conquered Race, Gender, And The F-16 | Task & Purpose

Maj. Christina Hopper’s family is about as military as it gets. The legacy of service in her family made being a military brat a key part of her identity. Born in Norway while both her parents were stationed there with the Air Force, Hopper didn’t move to the United States until she was 4 years old. Her trajectory, following in her parents’ footsteps to the military, was normal, expected almost. But Hopper’s story deviates from the typical military brat-turned service member in that she didn’t only join the Air Force, she became the first black female pilot to fly a […]

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Documentary to tell story of all-black Army unit that protected Hawaii in WWII | Hawaii News Now

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – During World War II, the 369th Antiaircraft Artillery Regiment made up entirely of African-American soldiers was stationed in Hawaii. The troops hailed from New York and were known as the Harlem Rattlers. “I think it is a human interest story,” Monmouth University professor Nancy Mezey said. Mezey is part of a team researching and documenting the story of the segregated unit, and the little-known fact that it helped guard Hawaii in the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Jim Mendoza,Hawaii News Now Gwendolynn Brooks, 1950. Bettmann / Getty Images. Full article @ Hawaii News Now Share […]

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World War II veteran calls honorable discharge from Army to correct an ‘injustice’ nearly 75 years later ‘a miracle’ | Chicago Tribune

PHILADELPHIA World War II veteran Nelson Henry Jr. never thought he would see the day the Army would correct his discharge nearly 75 years after he was forced to leave the military because of the color of his skin. Henry, 95, of Philadelphia, received word Monday from the Army Correction of Military Records office that his discriminatory “blue discharge” from 1945 because he was black has been changed to honorable. He called the unanimous decision by a three-member board a miracle. “It’s unbelievable. I’m still wondering if it’s a dream,” Henry said in an interview Tuesday in his Logan Square […]

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We Did It, They Hid It: How Memorial Day Was Stripped Of Its African American Roots | Black Then

What we now know as Memorial Day began as “Decoration Day” in the immediate aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It was a tradition initiated by former slaves to celebrate emancipationand commemorate those who died for that cause. These days, Memorial Day is arranged as a day “without politics”—a general patriotic celebration of all soldiers and veterans, regardless of the nature of the wars in which they participated. This is the opposite of how the day emerged, with explicitly partisan motivations, to celebrate those who fought for justice and liberation. The concept that the population must “remember the sacrifice” of […]

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General’s family: From segregation to command in 100 years | AP

Christina L. Myers, AP In this Feb. 9, 2019 photo, Brig. Gen. Milford H. Beagle, Jr. commanding general of Fort Jackson, speaks to the president of the Sgt. Isaac Woodard Historical Marker Association following the dedication ceremony in Batesburg-Leesville, S.C. Beagle, Jr. who now leads the Army’s Fort Jackson in South Carolina is descended from a soldier who served there in a segregated military more than a century ago. (AP Photo/Christina Myers). Featured Image , S.C. (AP) — Pvt. Walter Beagles arrived at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, in 1918, an African American draftee in a segregated Army that relegated black […]

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These Photos of a Segregated U.S. Navy Unit Were Lost for Decades. They Still Have a Story to Tell | Time

John Edwin Mason, Time Photographs by Wayne Miller—Magnum Photos. Featured Image are many ways to photograph a black person, and it’s easy for things to go horribly wrong. America’s long history of racist imagery makes that quite clear. Wayne Miller, a white man, was notable for doing it right. In the mid-20th century, a time when American visual culture was suffused with photographs that reinforced demeaning notions about black people, Miller created deeply empathetic images with a understated, yet unmistakable anti-racist intent. He made his best known photographs of African Americans on Chicago’s South Side, between 1946 and 1948. But […]

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At 98, the Army Just Made Him an Officer: A Tale of Racial Bias in World War II | The New York Times “Decades have gone by and there hadn’t been a measure of basic fairness, of basic justice that was brought to bear,”... “We owe him this commission.”

“Decades have gone by and there hadn’t been a measure of basic fairness, of basic justice that was brought to bear,”… “We owe him this commission.”

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