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Why Poor Schools Can’t Win at Standardized Testing | The Atlantic

The companies that create the most important state and national exams also publish textbooks that contain many of the answers. Unfortunately, low-income school districts can’t afford to buy them. You hear a lot nowadays about the magic of big data. Getting hold of the right numbers can increase revenue, improve decision-making, or help you find a mate—or so the thinking goes. In 2009, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan told a crowd of education researchers: “I am a deep believer in the power of data to drive our decisions. Data gives us the roadmap to reform. It tells us where we […]

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Black students at Oxford University to get scholarships from black American tech entrepreneur | USA Today

SAN FRANCISCO — Technology investor and entrepreneur Arlan Hamilton is funding a new scholarship for black undergraduate students at Oxford University, a first for the educational institution. The scholarship, partly named for Hamilton’s mother, will cover fees and living costs for one undergraduate student a year for three years beginning in 2020. The value of the scholarship fund is about £220,000 (or nearly $300,000), Oxford said. A black woman who has written her own unique success story as an entrepreneur and investor in the mostly white and male tech sector, Hamilton is a former music tour manager without a college […]

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Op-ed: Black male teachers have positive influence on students of all races | The State

I was wasting time on Twitter when I came across a post that stopped me mid-scroll. The original post posed a question: How many black male educators did you have in kindergarten through 12th grade. One of my former students chimed in with a shocking number: 1…Coach Thorne. That’s me; that’s who I was. I taught social studies at Blythewood High School for 11 years and was an assistant football coach. At first glance, the number 1 seems to be an indictment and a referendum on what we in education circles have known forever — we need more black men […]

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Students Rally in Maryland’s Capital to Resolve Longstanding HBCU Lawsuit | Black Press USA

Students and alumni from Maryland’s four historically black colleges rallied near the state Capitol building in a call for a resolution to a 13-year-old federal lawsuit over disparities in academic programs. Individuals from Bowie State, Coppin, Morgan State, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore arrived early and filled the streets chanting and demanding that lawmakers and Gov. Larry Hogan settle the longstanding dispute. Inside the complex of government buildings, members of the Legislative Black Caucus of Maryland were urging lawmakers to stand behind a nearly $600 million settlement previously reached by the state and the Coalition for Equity and […]

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Impact and not optics: How we can increase the number of African Americans in medicine | The St. Louis American

I am the lead author of a peer-reviewed manuscript that details how U.S. medical school diversity initiatives are leaving us behind. This is a summary of the article, which was published in Academic Medicine, and a call to action to improve our representation and the health of our communities. U.S. medical education diversity initiatives were born out of the Civil Rights Movement in an effort to increase the representation of African Americans in the physician workforce. Over the last 50 years, these efforts have evolved to include other minority groups that are underrepresented in medicine, and efforts to specifically identify […]

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Nas Becomes ‘The Voice of Hennessy’ to Empower HBCU Students | Black Enterprise

Legendary hip-hop artist Nasir “Nas” Jones has teamed up with Hennessy and the Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) to uplift graduate students of color attending historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). The Queens-born rapper can be heard narrating a video promoting the Hennessy Fellows Program, a $10 million graduate scholarship initiative launched earlier this year to empower young African American leaders through financial assistance, access, and real-world work experience. “I’m proud to lend my voice to encourage enrollment in the Hennessy Fellows Program, a new graduate program created for students who want to blaze their own trails and pursue their […]

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History and African American studies faculty receive three-year UC-HBCU Pathways Grant | UCI News

Jessica Millward, UCI associate professor of history, and Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, UCI associate professor of African American studies, have received a three-year, $271,902 UC-HBCU Pathways Grant to partner with Morgan State University, a public and historically black research university in Baltimore. Administered by the UC Office of the President, the grants encourage UC faculty to actively engage in collaboration and cooperation with faculty and students at historically black colleges and universities to attract and retain graduate scholars who reflect the communities of the world. During the summers of 2020, 2021 and 2022, Millward and Willoughby-Herard will host four HBCU students on […]

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Is ‘Diversity’ Destroying The HBCUs? | Forbes

A new research brief from the Center for Minority Serving Institutions at Rutgers University asserts, “It can be argued that historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are experiencing a renaissance in terms of their enrollment of black students.” I found this startling, since for years HBCU enrollments have trended downward. Moreover, overall enrollments are in decline, so some further decline in HBCU enrollment is expected. The authors of the Rutgers study, Janelle Williams and Robert Palmer, hypothesize that increases in race-related incidents, which they call the “Missouri Effect” (after significant race-related protests at the University of Missouri) have led black […]

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Rediscovering “The Hampton Album,” a Renowned Record of African-American History After the Civil War | Feature Shoot

Credited as the first female photojournalist in the United States, Frances Benjamin Johnston (1864-1952) received a commission in 1899 to photograph the Hampton Institute, a private historically Black university located in Hampton, Virginia. Founded in 1868, just four years after the Civil War, the Hampton Institute was dedicated to the education of African-American men and women — and from 1878 to 1923, also maintained a program for Native Americans. The campus was located on the grounds of “Little Scotland,” a former plantation. Among its many illustrious alumni was no less than Booker T. Washington who taught at Hampton after he […]

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