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Roxanne Roxanne | Kennedy-Center.org From the producers of Fruitvale Station and Dope comes this Netflix film that chronicles the journey of Lolita “Roxanne Shanté” Gooden from a fierce teenage battle emcee to Hip Hop legend. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Kennedy Center Hip Hop Culture Council member and film producer Mimi Valdés, Roxanne Shanté, and more.

From the producers of Fruitvale Station and Dope comes this Netflix film that chronicles the journey of Lolita “Roxanne Shanté” Gooden from a fierce teenage battle emcee to Hip Hop legend. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Kennedy Center Hip Hop Culture Council member and film producer Mimi Valdés, Roxanne Shanté, and more.

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‘Passing for white’: how a taboo film genre is being revived to expose racial privilege | The Guardian Rebecca Hall’s directorial debut is an adaptation of Nella Larsen’s 1929 novel Passing, a theme little seen since the likes of Show Boat and Pinky

Rebecca Hall’s directorial debut is an adaptation of Nella Larsen’s 1929 novel Passing, a theme little seen since the likes of Show Boat and Pinky.

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Rory ‘DC’ Felton, victim of fatal stabbing, remembered as pioneering member of go-go scene | The Washington Post Rory “DC” Felton, a pioneering member of the city’s go-go scene, was remembered Sunday for his ebullient personality and his love of the District — best captured by the energetic tune “Take a Little Ride Through the City,” which the saxophonist co-wrote with his Rare Essence bandmates.

Rory “DC” Felton, a pioneering member of the city’s go-go scene, was remembered Sunday for his ebullient personality and his love of the District — best captured by the energetic tune “Take a Little Ride Through the City,” which the saxophonist co-wrote with his Rare Essence bandmates.

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What Makes a Greeting Card Black? | The New York Times In 1991 the Hallmark greeting card company, based in Kansas City, Mo., decided it was time to get serious about diversity. America was changing, as was Hallmark’s work force, and while the brand had dabbled in cards for black consumers since the 1960s, it didn’t have a perennial line that addressed them directly.

In 1991 the Hallmark greeting card company, based in Kansas City, Mo., decided it was time to get serious about diversity. America was changing, as was Hallmark’s work force, and while the brand had dabbled in cards for black consumers since the 1960s, it didn’t have a perennial line that addressed them directly.

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