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After the Eviction Notice | The New York Times

In North Charleston, S.C., a struggling family pulls together for the bitter experience of moving out. Shanatea Turner’s landlord filed eviction papers against her in mid-November. By early December, the pile of belongings she had no choice but to throw out was starting to grow on the curb. And the family she had tried to hold together was breaking up. A year and a half ago, Shanatea’s daughter Twanda Porterfield was pregnant and living in a hotel. She had lost her two children to the state’s foster care system. Shanatea moved from Orlando vowing to find a home for her […]

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Being a protective black mom isn’t a parenting choice—it’s the only choice | Quartz

Salena Alston is an involved parent. The 40-year-old mother of seven describes herself as a “liberally strict” mom who keeps track of her kids’ friends and whereabouts but also encourages their independence and accountability. Alston wouldn’t call herself a helicopter parent per se, but it’s a trope that she sometimes identifies with, simply out of necessity. Raising black children in a predominantly white suburb of Atlanta sometimes requires an extra bit of “hovering.” Recently, Alston and her husband saw their youngest, an 11-year-old boy, swinging on the net at their neighborhood’s tennis court with his friends, who were white. The […]

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Meet the Black woman who has fed thousands for free on thanksgiving for almost 40 years | Yen

Kind-hearted Janet Easley has been serving Thanksgiving dinner to thousands of needy people in central Indiana every holiday for the last 38 years. Indianapublicmedia.org writes that Janet Easley has welcomed everyone to the Turner Family Thanksgiving Meal, which will be held at three locations across Indianapolis in 2019. Easley has invited everybody including children and parents especially single parents going through hard times. She will be serving “Turkey, potatoes or mashed potatoes, corn and green beans. Thus any sober assessment of this history must conclude that the present objections to cancel culture are not so much concerned with the weapon, […]

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25 Maryland corrections officers indicted on 236 counts | WBALTV 11

BALTIMORE — Twenty-five corrections officers have been indicted on 236 counts that includes use of excessive force, Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby announced Tuesday. “All 25 of these correctional officers have allegedly abused their power and abused our trust,” Mosby said. Prosecutes said the investigation started as a tip in 2018 about a single incident involving unnecessary force at a Baltimore Correctional Facility. Mosby said the officers, who are part of the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services’ Baltimore Central Regional Tactical Unit, are accused of acts of violence, intimidation and use of excessive force. Kai Reed, […]

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Housing Discrimination Complaints Reach 24-Year High, While HUD Rolls Back Fair Housing Rules | The Washington Informer

As a candidate, President Donald Trump promised that if elected, deregulation of the federal government would be an administration priority. Soon after taking the oath of office, he issued an executive order requiring all departments and agencies to eliminate two existing regulations for every one new regulation proposed. In some cases, rules that were adopted before his term in office began but had not yet taken effect were either suspended or delayed. For example, the long-awaited payday rule at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) was one important consumer protection that was delayed. Similarly, at the Department of Education, two […]

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Success Comes from Affirming Your Potential | Harvard Business Review

When you see how underrepresented African-Americans are in current leadership roles, it can be easy to get discouraged about their prospects for leadership advancement. Despite a rise in the number of black college and university graduates, just 8% of managers and under 4% of CEOs are black. In the Fortune 500 companies there are currently only three black chief executives, down from a high of 12 in 2002. We, however, are not discouraged. In the course of our research, we have met myriad African-American leaders who, despite being underestimated, underappreciated, and under-resourced, have prospered and achieved incredible success. How do […]

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Serena Williams Raises Awareness About Financial Abuse | Black Enterprise

Serena Williams is always taking a positive stance when she is not playing tennis. According to CBS News, Williams is now the national ambassador for the Allstate Foundation Purple Purse program. “A really close friend of mine was going through a situation that wasn’t really healthy for her, wasn’t healthy for her friends, or her family — and it was difficult to tell her,” she said. “And then I realized, look, oh my goodness, she’s — all the signs that I was learning about with financial abuse, she was involved in.” “I had no idea what financial abuse was. When […]

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Suicide attempts by Black teens have risen, and I’m not surprised | Mic

I remember the first time a friend of mine died by suicide. I was living in Washington, D.C. when I got the phone call from our mutual friend, Preston. The friend we’d just lost was a young Black man brimming with potential. He had a smile that lit up a room and an incomparable sense of humor. His death shook us all up and I wondered how many more losses of Black men I’d experience. Thoughts about depression’s subtle yet brutal grip on my community came flooding back this week after I read CNN’s story about the rise of suicide […]

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Black U.S. Olympians Won In Nazi Germany Only To Be Overlooked At Home | NPR

Eighty years ago this month, the United States competed in the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games in Nazi Germany, with 18 African-American athletes part of the U.S. squad. Track star Jesse Owens, one of the greatest Olympians of all time, won four gold medals. What the 17 other African-American Olympians did in Berlin, though, has largely been forgotten — and so too has their rough return home to racial segregation. “Determination! That’s what it takes,” one of the athletes, John Woodruff, said during a 1996 oral history interview for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. “A lot of fire in the stomach!” […]

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