Biography of Gwendolyn Brooks, the People’s Poet | ThoughtCo

Jeffrey Somers, ThoughtCo Gwendolynn Brooks. Bettmann / Getty Images. Featured Image n many ways, Gwendolyn Brooks embodies the black American experience of the 20th century. Born into a family that moved to Chicago as part of the Great Migration of blacks to the north of the country, she made her way through school during the…

Read More
After 136 Years, The Met will Finally Host an Opera by a Black Composer | Okayplayer

Zo, Okayplayer Henry Adebonojo. Featured Image erence Blanchard‘s heralded opera, Fire Shut Up in My Bones, is set to make its debut at The Metropolitan Opera House in NYC. Though it had plenty to choose from over the last century or so, the production will be the first-ever opera by a black composer to be…

Read More
Ta-Nehisi Coates On Magic, Memory And The Underground Railroad | NPR

Terry Gross, NPR Ta-Nehisi Coates’ 2014 Atlantic Magazine cover story, “The Case for Reparations,” led to a national conversation about how to reckon with injustices resulting from years of slavery. He won a National Book Award in 2015 for Between the World and Me. Gabriella Demczuk/The New York Times. Featured Image rowing up in Maryland,…

Read More
BANNED: The Bluest Eye| PBS

FROM THE COLLECTION: THE LIBRARY, PBS The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison’s first novel, was published in 1970. Set in Lorain, Ohio — where Morrison herself was born — the book tells the story of Pecola Breedlove, an eleven-year-old African American girl who is convinced that she is ugly, and yearns to have lighter skin and…

Read More
For The ‘Nickel Boys,’ Life Isn’t Worth 5 Cents | NPR

Michael Schaub, NPR long string of horrors that took place at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys wasn’t a secret, but it might as well have been. Former students of the Florida reform school had spoken out for years about the brutal beatings that they endured at the hands of sadistic employees, but it…

Read More