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Byron Allen Strikes $290M Deal To Buy 11 Local Stations From USA Television | Deadline

Dade Hayes, Deadline yron Allen’s Entertainment Studios has acquired 11 local TV stations from USA Television for $290 million. The stations serve small to mid-sized cities (spanning markets ranked No. 79 to No. 188 in the U.S.) and have network affiliations with ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox. While the deal’s valuation is a fraction of the recent Nexstar-Tribune local TV merger, the USA pickup is the latest in a series of moves by Allen. His company is a partner in the recent takeover of the formerly Fox-run regional sports networks led by the Sinclair Broadcast Group. It also acquired four […]

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Tuskegee Airman Leslie Edwards dies at Cincinnati VA Hospital | WCPO

WCPO staff, WCPO Leslie Edwards, 93, of Springfield Township, is a Tuskegee Airman who served as a mechanic during World War II. (Photo: The Enquirer/Liz Dufour). Featured Image eslie Edwards didn’t talk about his military career during his daughter’s childhood — or her adulthood, for that matter. Imogene Bowers was 50 years old when she learned that her small, slight father had been one of the Tuskegee Airmen, the first black military aviators in United States history. “He did not allow any of the focus to be on him,” she said Tuesday night. “Even when you talked about the Tuskegee […]

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Fighting Germans and Jim Crow: Role of Black Troops on D-Day | Military.com

BATON ROUGE, La. — It was the most massive amphibious invasion the world has ever seen, with tens of thousands of Allied troops spread out across the air and sea aiming to get a toehold in Normandy for the final assault on Nazi Germany. And while portrayals of D-Day often depict an all-white host of invaders, in fact it also included many African Americans. Roughly 2,000 African American troops are believed to have hit the shores of Normandy in various capacities on June 6, 1944. Serving in a U.S. military still-segregated by race, they encountered discrimination both in the service […]

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Dr. Granville Coggs of San Antonio was Tuskegee Airman and Renaissance man | My San Antonio

Vincent Davis, My San Antonio Photo: EDWARD A. ORNELAS, STAFF / SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS, Featured Image wasn’t a challenge from which Dr. Granville Coleridge Coggs ever walked away. During World War II, when the U.S. military was racially segregated, Coggs, the grandson of slaves, completed pilot training to become one of the fabled Tuskegee Airmen. He graduated from Harvard Medical School to become a radiologist, and later invented a precision probe to help doctors locate cancer during breast screenings. For years, Coggs rose at 4 a.m. to swim laps in the pool at his Northwest. Side home. He sprinted for […]

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West Point gets 1st black superintendent in 216-year history | Army Times

The Associated Press, Army Times POINT, N.Y. — Lt. Gen. Darryl A. Williams, a 1983 U.S. Military Academy graduate who has held high-ranking Army posts in Europe and Asia, will become the first black officer to command West Point in its 216-year history, academy officials announced Friday. Williams will assume command as the academy’s 60th superintendent during a ceremony Monday morning in West Point’s Jefferson Hall, school officials said. The native of Alexandria, Virginia, has served as the deputy chief of staff for the U.S. Army in Europe and the deputy commanding general for support for the 2nd Infantry Division […]

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General’s family: From segregation to command in 100 years | AP

Christina L. Myers, AP In this Feb. 9, 2019 photo, Brig. Gen. Milford H. Beagle, Jr. commanding general of Fort Jackson, speaks to the president of the Sgt. Isaac Woodard Historical Marker Association following the dedication ceremony in Batesburg-Leesville, S.C. Beagle, Jr. who now leads the Army’s Fort Jackson in South Carolina is descended from a soldier who served there in a segregated military more than a century ago. (AP Photo/Christina Myers). Featured Image , S.C. (AP) — Pvt. Walter Beagles arrived at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, in 1918, an African American draftee in a segregated Army that relegated black […]

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These Photos of a Segregated U.S. Navy Unit Were Lost for Decades. They Still Have a Story to Tell | Time

John Edwin Mason, Time Photographs by Wayne Miller—Magnum Photos. Featured Image are many ways to photograph a black person, and it’s easy for things to go horribly wrong. America’s long history of racist imagery makes that quite clear. Wayne Miller, a white man, was notable for doing it right. In the mid-20th century, a time when American visual culture was suffused with photographs that reinforced demeaning notions about black people, Miller created deeply empathetic images with a understated, yet unmistakable anti-racist intent. He made his best known photographs of African Americans on Chicago’s South Side, between 1946 and 1948. But […]

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Harlem Hellfighters: The black soldiers who brought jazz to Europe | BBC

Video by Jane O’Brien and Bill McKenna, BBC War One brought many social changes – not least, the introduction of jazz to Europe. Thanks to a black American regiment of musicians called the Harlem Hellfighters, the French discovered the joys of syncopation. More than a century on, US musician Jason Moran is raising fresh awareness of the Hellfighters and their leader, James Reese Europe. CLICK TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE, BBC Share This +FacebookTwitterMail

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Africans Played Key, Often Unheralded, Role in World War I | The Afro American JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Amid the fanfare marking the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, little has been said about crucial participants in the conflict: Africans.

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Amid the fanfare marking the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, little has been said about crucial participants in the conflict: Africans.

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Black WWII veteran from Charleston faced bombs abroad, prejudice at home | The Post Courier

Surgery scars on his knees are the legacy of World War II for Julian Snipe. A mine exploded in Germany, destroying the ammo supply truck he was walking alongside. He woke on the ground in the bitter cold and couldn’t feel his legs. Snipe joined the Army in 1942 as an 18-year-old. He had grown up on a Johns Island family farm. He couldn’t wait to see more of the world. He had been jealous of the soldiers riding by in the buses in their uniforms, including the white ones who would point their rifles at him like they were […]

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