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Remembering the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre When Police Shot Dead Three Unarmed Black Students | Democracy Now

The 1968 Orangeburg massacre is one of the most violent and least remembered events of the civil rights movement. A crowd of students gathered on the campus of South Carolina State University to protest segregation at Orangeburg’s only bowling alley. After days of escalating tensions, students started a bonfire and held a vigil on the campus to protest. Dozens of police arrived on the scene, and state troopers fired live ammunition into the crowd. When the shooting stopped, three students were dead and 28 wounded. Although the tragedy predated the Kent State shootings and Jackson State killings and it was […]

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School district faces $12M lawsuit over ‘racist’ photo of African American students | AJC.com

Parents plan to sue a New York school district for $12 million after one of its teachers allegedly wrote the phrase “Monkey do” above a photograph of four African American students who attended a class trip to the Bronx Zoo in November. A science teacher at Longwood High School took the photo of the four zoology students and then included the image in a slideshow that was shown to the class right before holiday recess, according to reports. The photograph shows the teenagers lined up one behind another with their left arms outstretched and resting upon the heads of the […]

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Christian Soldiers | Slate

The lynching and torture of blacks in the Jim Crow South weren’t just acts of racism. They were religious rituals. The cliché is that Americans have a short memory, but since Saturday, a number of us have been arguing over medieval religious wars and whether they have any lessons for today’s violence in the Middle East. For those still unaware, this debate comes after President Obama’s comments at the annual National Prayer Breakfast, where—after condemning Islamic radical group ISIS as a “death cult”—he offered a moderating thought. “Lest we get on our high horse and think this is unique to […]

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When White Supremacists Overthrew an Elected Government | The New York Times

Wilmington’s Lie The Murderous Coup of 1898 and the Rise of White Supremacy By David Zucchino Today we Americans find ourselves struggling with the ghosts of our past. Some among us reach for histories that affirm the established view of who we are as a nation. Many believe the United States is, and must always be, a white nation. But moments of storm and stress also occasion the telling of different stories. We have seen this with The New York Times’s 1619 Project. Now we have David Zucchino’s brilliant new book. “Wilmington’s Lie” is a tragic story about the brutal […]

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Regina King on fighting white supremacists in Watchmen: ‘My community is living this story’ | The Guardian

The Oscar-winner is playing a cape-swishing superhero in HBO’s revamp of the epic comic book. She talks wage gaps, wardrobe woes and her dreams of becoming a dentist. Regina King had a hard time convincing some of her friends about Watchmen, her new HBO series inspired by the DC comic book of the same name and featuring the kind of details that make some people run for the exits: time travel, kung-fu fighting, masks and thinly veiled political allegory. “Girl, don’t do this,” said one friend. King could only smile and agree. But we would all do well to watch […]

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The Privilege of White Victimhood | Dame Magazine

We’re in the grips of a peak white-pity party moment. And it has the potential to incite a riot. Being an actual victim of anything sucks. This is a thing we are supposed to learn as we grow up. We’re supposed to grow out of the phase where we get jealous of the attention or the extra toys or balloons a sibling gets when they are sick or hurt and move on to being able to help out in those situations. Not everyone does. This past Saturday, Brian Hornaday, chief of the Herington Police Department in Kansas, posted an image […]

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White people assume niceness is the answer to racial inequality. It’s not | The Guardian

“While most of us see ourselves as ‘not racist’, we continue to reproduce racist outcomes and live segregated lives.” I am white. As an academic, consultant and writer on white racial identity and race relations, I speak daily with other white people about the meaning of race in our lives. These conversations are critical because, by virtually every measure, racial inequality persists, and institutions continue to be overwhelmingly controlled by white people. While most of us see ourselves as “not racist”, we continue to reproduce racist outcomes and live segregated lives. In the racial equity workshops I lead for American […]

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The Norfolk 17 face a hostile reception as schools reopen | The Virginian-Pilot

Three weeks later than originally scheduled, Norfolk schools were finally ready to open. Well, most of them. On Sept. 29, 1958, 48 of Norfolk’s schools welcomed students – but the doors of six were padlocked and under police guard. Maury, Norview and Granby high schools and Northside, Norview and Blair junior highs remained closed under a state order designed to fight integration. The 17 Negro students assigned to those schools started tutoring sessions at First Baptist Church Norfolk on Bute Street. They took classes in core subjects and Spanish, and were taught to brace themselves for the abuse sure to […]

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When Nat King Cole moved in | Curbed, Los Angeles

The entertainer found his dream home in picturesque Hancock Park—but the neighborhood had a dark side. In July 1948, singer Nat “King” Cole and his new wife, Maria, were just beginning their lives together. The legendary crooner of standards including “The Christmas Song,” “Nature Boy,” “Mona Lisa,” and “Unforgettable” had spent the last decade of his young life on the road, and he was eager to settle down and start a family. When they were not traveling, he and Maria, a singer and socialite of impeccable lineage, made-do by staying at LA’s Watkins Hotel. So, Maria hired a real estate […]

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Facial recognition fails on race, government study says | BBC News

A US government study suggests facial recognition algorithms are far less accurate at identifying African-American and Asian faces compared to Caucasian faces. African-American females were even more likely to be misidentified, it indicated. It throws fresh doubt on whether such technology should be used by law enforcement agencies. One critic called the results “shocking”. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (Nist) tested 189 algorithms from 99 developers, including Intel, Microsoft, Toshiba, and Chinese firms Tencent and DiDi Chuxing. One-to-one matching Amazon – which sells its facial recognition product Rekognition to US police forces – did not submit one for […]

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