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When Minneapolis Segregated | City Lab

In the early 1900s, racial housing covenants in the Minnesota city blocked home sales to minorities, establishing patterns of inequality that persist today. Before it was torn apart by freeway construction in the middle of the 20th century, the Near North neighborhood in Minneapolis was home to the city’s largest concentration of African American families. That wasn’t by accident: As far back as the early 1900s, racially restrictive covenants on property deeds prevented African Americans and other minorities from buying homes in many other areas throughout the city. In 1948, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that such racial covenants were […]

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The Privilege of White Victimhood | Dame Magazine

We’re in the grips of a peak white-pity party moment. And it has the potential to incite a riot. Being an actual victim of anything sucks. This is a thing we are supposed to learn as we grow up. We’re supposed to grow out of the phase where we get jealous of the attention or the extra toys or balloons a sibling gets when they are sick or hurt and move on to being able to help out in those situations. Not everyone does. This past Saturday, Brian Hornaday, chief of the Herington Police Department in Kansas, posted an image […]

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White people assume niceness is the answer to racial inequality. It’s not | The Guardian

“While most of us see ourselves as ‘not racist’, we continue to reproduce racist outcomes and live segregated lives.” I am white. As an academic, consultant and writer on white racial identity and race relations, I speak daily with other white people about the meaning of race in our lives. These conversations are critical because, by virtually every measure, racial inequality persists, and institutions continue to be overwhelmingly controlled by white people. While most of us see ourselves as “not racist”, we continue to reproduce racist outcomes and live segregated lives. In the racial equity workshops I lead for American […]

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The Norfolk 17 face a hostile reception as schools reopen | The Virginian-Pilot

Three weeks later than originally scheduled, Norfolk schools were finally ready to open. Well, most of them. On Sept. 29, 1958, 48 of Norfolk’s schools welcomed students – but the doors of six were padlocked and under police guard. Maury, Norview and Granby high schools and Northside, Norview and Blair junior highs remained closed under a state order designed to fight integration. The 17 Negro students assigned to those schools started tutoring sessions at First Baptist Church Norfolk on Bute Street. They took classes in core subjects and Spanish, and were taught to brace themselves for the abuse sure to […]

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The FBI Spends a Lot of Time Spying on Black Americans | The Intercept

THE FBI HAS come under intense criticism after a 2017 leak exposed that its counterterrorism division had invented a new, unfounded domestic terrorism category it called “black identity extremism.” Since then, legislators have pressured the bureau’s leadership to be more transparent about its investigation of black activists, and a number of civil rights groups have filed public records requests to try to better understand who exactly the FBI is investigating under that designation. Although the bureau has released hundreds of pages of documents, it continues to shield the vast majority of these records from public scrutiny. The sheer volume of […]

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What Canada and South Africa can teach the U.S. about slavery reparations | The Conversation

Bonny Ibhawoh, The Conversation Author Ta-Nehisi Coates, left, and actor Danny Glover, right, testify about reparation for the descendants of slaves during a hearing before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Capitol Hill on June 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais). Featured Image merica’s failure to understand, acknowledge and resolve the continuing catastrophe of slavery is holding back the entire nation. Without broad public recognition that the country’s original wealth was derived unjustly through slavery, and that deliberate post-Emancipation efforts perpetuated the social and economic gulf between white and Black America, there can be no justice or healing. Recently, a group […]

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