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Artifacts show a Rosa Parks steeped in freedom struggle from childhood (2015) | The Washington Post

When Rosa Parks was a little girl in rural Alabama, she would stay up at night, keeping watch with her grandfather as he stood guard with a shotgun against marauding members of the Ku Klux Klan. Klansmen often terrorized black communities in the early 1900s, and Parks’s grandfather, Sylvester Edwards, the son of a white plantation owner, had their house boarded up for protection. But Parks longed for a showdown. “I wanted to see him kill a Ku-Kluxer,” the renowned civil rights leader wrote in a brief biographical sketch years later. “He declared that the first to invade our home […]

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Ruth Carter and Cynthia Erivo on Clothes, Culture and Self-Expression | The New York Times Style Magazine

Two creative people in two different fields in one wide-ranging conversation. “This has been a long time coming!” said Ruth Carter, 59, in her Academy Award acceptance speech for best costume design for her work on the film “Black Panther” (2018). Carter, who was born in Springfield, Mass., and lives in Los Angeles, is the first African-American to win that Oscar, and her résumé reads like a tour through the past three decades of black cinema: After getting her start with the director Spike Lee on “School Daze” (1988) and “Do the Right Thing” (1989), she went on to costume […]

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Meet 5 Black Women Who Are Making A Splash In The Art World | Essence

Those paintings by Black artists that we see hanging in a gallery or major museum didn’t get there by happenstance. When it comes to the business of art, strong representation is essential for the creatives behind the works we consume. The talents first had to be discovered by someone with a reasonable amount of power, someone who could wholly support them. From museum curators to gallery owners and directors, here are some of the women responsible for getting Black art in front of mainstream eyes. JOEONNA BELLORADO-SAMUELS DIRECTOR JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY NEW YORK CITY What does your position entail? As […]

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Facial recognition fails on race, government study says | BBC News

A US government study suggests facial recognition algorithms are far less accurate at identifying African-American and Asian faces compared to Caucasian faces. African-American females were even more likely to be misidentified, it indicated. It throws fresh doubt on whether such technology should be used by law enforcement agencies. One critic called the results “shocking”. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (Nist) tested 189 algorithms from 99 developers, including Intel, Microsoft, Toshiba, and Chinese firms Tencent and DiDi Chuxing. One-to-one matching Amazon – which sells its facial recognition product Rekognition to US police forces – did not submit one for […]

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Why Poor Schools Can’t Win at Standardized Testing | The Atlantic

The companies that create the most important state and national exams also publish textbooks that contain many of the answers. Unfortunately, low-income school districts can’t afford to buy them. You hear a lot nowadays about the magic of big data. Getting hold of the right numbers can increase revenue, improve decision-making, or help you find a mate—or so the thinking goes. In 2009, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan told a crowd of education researchers: “I am a deep believer in the power of data to drive our decisions. Data gives us the roadmap to reform. It tells us where we […]

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Review: A Brother and Sister Triumph Together at Carnegie Hall | The New York Times

The cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason gave a superb New York recital debut alongside the pianist Isata Kanneh-Mason. Mexican territory and who are recognized by the Mexican state as groups with the right of free determination. This ‘right of free determination’ includes the right to decide the internal forms of social, economic, political, and cultural organization, the right to preserve and enrich language and culture, and the right to elect representatives to the municipal council, among other things. In 2016, the British cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason won the prestigious BBC Young Musician of the Year Award. Early in 2018, his debut recording on […]

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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Finally Recognizes Woman Who Practically Invented Rock and Roll | Jezebel

This year’s inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame have been announced, and they have finally gotten around to adding Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who’s got a pretty good claim to having invented that shit. She got her credit the same year as Dire Straits and Bon Jovi. The Wall Street Journal reported that Tharpe—a major gospel star who broke ground with her electric guitar style and tackling of secular themes, predating the Sun Records crew and paving the way for basically everybody who came afterward—will be inducted in the “early influences” category. Jessica Diaz-Hurtado wrote of Tharpe’s distinctive […]

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The Future Is Female: Meet the Dope Black Women Behind Brooklyn’s Local Creative Space | Refinery 29

For Symone Wong, Jarryn Mercer, and Melissa Sutherland, Brooklyn’s sk.ArtSpace is more than a gallery space — it’s a safe space for creatives of color to express themselves in an environment that understands and works to preserve the integrity of their craft. “As a creative, sharing yourself and your work is very challenging. A lot of creatives do not know where to begin, what kind of dialogues to have, or even how to get their work into shows,” the ladies, who have been friends for 14 years, share. “Typically, the local creatives in our community have access to exhibits that […]

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24-Year-Old Black Woman Started Selling Fish Plates, Now Farms 500 Acres | We Buy Black

“White people owned the land and Black people only worked in their gardens or fields.” That’s what Njabulo Mbokane once thought about agriculture but not anymore. Njabulo knew that her family couldn’t afford to send her to college so she had to find another way. She started out selling fish and chips on the corner of a gas station but now she employs three people fulltime and another 13 during the busy harvesting season, as a farmer in South Africa. Njabulo grows corn on over 500 acres of farmland and recently, ventured into livestock on another 64 acres. Njabulo Mbokane […]

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