Press Enter / Return to begin your search.

The Hunting of Billie Holiday | Politico

How Lady Day was in the middle of a Federal Bureau of Narcotics fight for survival From his first day in office in 1930, Harry Anslinger had a problem, and everybody knew it. He had just been appointed head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics—a tiny agency, buried in the gray bowels of the Treasury Department in Washington, D.C.—and it seemed to be on the brink of being abolished. This was the old Department of Prohibition, but prohibition had been abolished and his men needed a new role, fast. As he looked over his new staff—just a few years before […]

Read More

Jimmy Heath, 93, Jazz Saxophonist and Composer, Is Dead | The New York Times

Jimmy Heath, a tenor saxophonist whose sharp and lively compositions became part of the midcentury jazz canon — and who found new prominence in middle age as a co-leader of a popular band with his two brothers — died on Sunday at his home in Loganville, Ga. He was 93. His grandson Fa Mtume confirmed his death. Mr. Heath’s saxophone sound was spare but playful, with a beaming tone that exuded both joy and command. But his reputation rested equally on his abilities as a composer and arranger for large ensembles, interpolating bebop’s crosshatched rhythms and extended improvisations into lush […]

Read More

Fifty Years of Worship at the Church of John Coltrane | The New Yorker

Franzo and Marina King had recently moved from the Midwest to San Francisco when they decided to celebrate their first wedding anniversary by going to hear John Coltrane play at the Jazz Workshop. It was 1965, and the saxophonist was in the midst of a radical transformation, infatuated with a style of playing that was rapturous and free. “When he walked out, the Holy Ghost walked out with him,” Marina remembered. The couple had a spiritual experience. At times, it was as though Coltrane was looking directly at them while he played. “In our minds, we felt like he knew […]

Read More

A Lost Album From John Coltrane, With Thanks To A French-Canadian Director | NPR

Nate Chinen, NPR John Coltrane, photographed in his backyard in Queens, New York in 1963. JB/© Jim Marshall Photography LLC.Featured Image is never any end,” John Coltrane said sometime in the mid-1960s, at the height of his powers. “There are always new sounds to imagine; new feelings to get at.” Coltrane, one of jazz’s most revered saxophonists, was speaking to Nat Hentoff about an eternal quest — a compulsion to reach toward the next horizon, and the next. More than half a century after his death, that restless pronouncement also carries implications for us, the beneficiaries of Coltrane’s music. Not […]

Read More

Birmingham school teacher tops Billboard Smooth Jazz chart | CBS42

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) — Kim Scott is the head of the music department at the Alabama School of the Fine Arts. The Flutist also has a chart-topping new single out. Her recent release, “Emerge” is number one on the Billboard Smooth Jazz chart. When she isn’t teaching, Kim Scott is playing her flute. She says she started in 2010 with the vision of playing Jazz and wanted to represent the flute because “there wasn’t a lot of the sound on the radio.” Scott told CBS 42, “It’s a beautiful instrument, not just in the classical music the classical genre. So, […]

Read More

The Man They Called ‘Trane’, Remembering A Jazz Giant | uDiscoverMusic

Richard Havers, uDiscoverMusic Coltrane died on 17 July 1967 having given more to jazz in his 40 years than many who live a much longer life. His music has been an inspiration to many rock musicians as well as younger jazz musicians and his album, A Love Supreme, is one of the acknowledged masterpieces in the jazz canon. Born in North Carolina in September 1926, Coltrane’s father was a tailor and amateur musician able to play several instruments. Coltrane also showed an aptitude for music, studying the E-flat tenor (alto) horn, clarinet and alto saxophone in high school. Both of […]

Read More

Stream the “Complete” John Coltrane Playlist: A 94-Hour Journey Through 700+ Transformative Tracks | Open Culture

Josh Jones, Open Culture a contrarian take on the legacy of John Coltrane on the 50th anniversary of his death last year, Zack Graham at GQ did not recommend Giant Steps nor A Love Supreme nor Blue Train nor My Favorite Things as the most important album in the artist’s career, but a record most casual jazz fans may never encounter, and which even the hardest-core Coltrane fans never heard in his lifetime. Recorded in the year of his death, Interstellar Space—a frenetic suite of free jazz duets with drummer Rashied Ali—didn’t appear until 1974. The album has since received […]

Read More