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Fannie Lou Hamer | PBS

Fannie Lou Hamer was born in 1917, the 20th child of Lou Ella and James Lee Townsend, sharecroppers east of the Mississippi Delta. She first joined her family in the cotton fields at the age of six. Although she managed to complete several years of school, by adolescence she was picking hundreds of pounds of cotton a day. In the early 1940s she married Perry Hamer, known as Pap, and worked alongside him at W.D. Marlow’s plantation near Ruleville, in Sunflower County. Hamer’s ability to read and write earned her the job of timekeeper, a less physically demanding and more […]

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In 1918, A Black Man Avoided Lynching & Convinced The Mob To Donate To His School. | InspireMore

His passion for his students was so strong that not even tornadoes, financial difficulties, or an attempted lynching could stop his work. In the dictionary, a hero is defined as “a person who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities.” Oftentimes, heroes work tirelessly behind the scenes to give aid to those who are less fortunate, never giving a moment’s thought to recognition for their good deeds. Risking their lives to help others without doing it for the spotlight is the true mark of a noble hero. Throughout our country’s history, there have been many men […]

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Goodbye, Columbus Day. CPS ends the holiday in favor of Indigenous Peoples Day — and parade organizers call it ‘a slap in the face.’ | Chicago Tribune

Columbus Day will no longer be observed in Chicago Public Schools — and the group behind the city’s annual Columbus Day parade is already pushing to reverse that decision. “This is a slap in the face of the more than 500,000 Italian Americans in Chicago, and the 135 million Italian Americans worldwide,” said Sergio Giangrande, president of the Joint Civic Committee of Italian Americans, in a statement provided to the Tribune. Giangrande said the group “is challenging CPS’s decision and has mounted a campaign to reverse this action.” Following similar moves in other school districts and cities, the Chicago Board […]

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Calls to boycott the black woman-owned Honey Pot Company backfired spectacularly | Fast Company

After deeming a Target ad for the feminine-product brand “racist,” some people attempted to trash the company online. Target is consistent when it comes to branding itself as inclusive and supportive of small businesses. In February, for instance, Target celebrated Black History Month as it does every year, by highlighting a selection of black-owned brands. One of those brands was the Honey Pot Company, which makes plant-based feminine products and is owned by Bea Dixon. The Honey Pot commercial had been running all February without incident. But then all hell broke loose on March 1, when fans of Honey Pot […]

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The Black Girls Cheer Movement Empowers Young Cheerleaders of Color | Black Enterprise

A movement to empower young black girls is gaining momentum, according to ABC News, thanks to Black Girls Cheer. Sharita Richardson was and still is fond of cheerleading, a lifelong passion. The woman with roots in North Carolina started cheerleading in middle school. As a mother, she raised three daughters who cheered competitively. In 2014, Richardson took a different perspective of cheerleading as a doctoral student. “Someone said the best thing to do your dissertation on is something you know a lot about, and I was kind of lost because I didn’t really know a lot about anything besides cheerleading. […]

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