Culture

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BY NESTOR RAMOS | GLOBE STAFF

The Boston Globe won Pulitzer Prizes for commentary and photography on Monday, earning multiple awards for the first time since 1984 and joining a wide-ranging group of honorees in journalism and the arts.

Former Globe opinion writer Farah Stockman won for a series of columns about Boston after busing, and Globe photographer Jessica Rinaldi won for heartwrenching pictures that documented the hard life of a child in poverty.

The New York Times, The New Yorker magazine and the Tampa Bay Times — which won awards for both local and investigative reporting — also won multiple prizes in this year’s competition, which recognized the best journalism published by newspapers, magazines and websites in 2015.

“I’m grateful that the work of The Boston Globe continues to be admired by the respected journalists who award Pulitzer Prizes,” said John W. Henry, the Globe’s owner and publisher. “The Greater Boston community is well-served by a dedicated staff — both on the editorial and news side — committed to shining a light on important issues within our community.”

The winners announced by Columbia University in the 14 journalism categories included coverage from around the nation and the world, from the Los Angeles Times’ moment-by-moment reporting on the San Bernardino shootings to an Associated Press investigation that revealed slaves are being used to catch the fish Americans eat.

Read More, Boston Globe
Pulitzer.org, Profile

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Globe Wins Two Pulitzers

Melissa Harris-Perry Joins ELLE.com as Editor-at-Large

Melissa Harris-Perry, MHP, Elle Magazine, Elle.com, KOLUMN Magazine, Kolumn

I could not be more thrilled to announce that Melissa Harris-Perry has joined ELLE.com as editor-at-large. In this role, Harris-Perry will focus on the intersection of race, gender, politics, and yes, even fashion, telling the often-overlooked stories of women and girls of color right here on ELLE.com and across ELLE's social platforms.

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BY ANGELA BRONNER HELM

Nate Parker’s depiction of America’s largest slave rebellion has us salivating for the October film release.

First of all, how much do we love the fact that Nate Parker’s film on Nat Turner’s slave uprising is called The Birth of a Nation reclaiming the moniker of one of the most virulently racist movies in the entire American film canon?

Second, can we hardly wait for the October release, which finally, and if the trailer is any indication, hauntingly, tells the story of the enslaved and slavery from an African-American perspective?

On Friday, Fox Searchlight debuted an almost two-minute clip of Birth of a Nation, Parker’s eight-years-in-the-making magnum opus, opening with the chords of Nina Simone’s “Strange Fruit,” and bathed in moody sepia and blue tones.

The film was raucously received at the Sundance Film Festival in January, where distributors got into a bidding war and Fox Searchlight was ultimately victorious paying $17.5 million. (Parker also won the Audience Award and Grand Jury Prize at Sundance.)

Read More, The Root


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Watch: The Birth of a Nation Trailer Will Make Your Hair Stand on End

Meet Zena Howard, The Architect Behind D.C.’s African American Museum It wasn’t until Zena Howard saw The Brady Bunch that she knew what she wanted to do for the rest of her life. It was because of the family sitcom that, at the age of seven or eight, she discovered what an architect was.">Meet Zena Howard, The Architect Behind D.C.’s African American Museum It wasn’t until Zena Howard saw The Brady Bunch that she knew what she wanted to do for the rest of her life. It was because of the family sitcom that, at the age of seven or eight, she discovered what an architect was.

Washington DC, African American Museum, Zena Howard, KOLUMN Magazine, Kolumn Magazine
It wasn’t until Zena Howard saw The Brady Bunch that she knew what she wanted to do for the rest of her life. It was because of the family sitcom that, at the age of seven or eight, she discovered what an architect was.
Meet Zena Howard, The Architect Behind D.C.’s African American Museum It wasn’t until Zena Howard saw The Brady Bunch that she knew what she wanted to do for the rest of her life. It was because of the family sitcom that, at the age of seven or eight, she discovered what an architect was." class="btn btn-sm btn-link"> Read More