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BANNED: The Bluest Eye| PBS

FROM THE COLLECTION: THE LIBRARY, PBS The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison’s first novel, was published in 1970. Set in Lorain, Ohio — where Morrison herself was born — the book tells the story of Pecola Breedlove, an eleven-year-old African American girl who is convinced that she is ugly, and yearns to have lighter skin and blue eyes. This, she believes, could change her lot in life. Pecola lives in a violent household. Her parents consistently fight, and Pecola herself becomes pregnant after being raped by her alcoholic father, Cholly. Since its publication, the book has consistently landed on the American […]

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Beloved St. Louis stage veteran Linda Kennedy passes at 68 | The St. Louis American

Kenya Vaughn, The St. Louis American A snapshot of mid-century South Philly. Featured Image Alton Randall Kennedy, a staple of the St. Louis theater scene for more than four decades, passed away this morning (Friday, August 16) after a battle with cancer. Her son Terell Randall Sr. confirmed her passing via Facebook. She was 68. “With a heavy heart, I am sorry to have to say that my mother Linda Kennedy now has her wings,” Randall said. She was perhaps best known as an actress but contributed to the St. Louis theater scene in nearly every capacity – including director, […]

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For The ‘Nickel Boys,’ Life Isn’t Worth 5 Cents | NPR

Michael Schaub, NPR long string of horrors that took place at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys wasn’t a secret, but it might as well have been. Former students of the Florida reform school had spoken out for years about the brutal beatings that they endured at the hands of sadistic employees, but it wasn’t until 2012, when University of South Florida anthropologists began to uncover unmarked graves on the school’s campus, that the world began to care. The discoveries weren’t news to the “White House Boys,” a group of men who say they survived brutal assaults by Dozier […]

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She’s Creating An All-Female Superhero Comic Book Universe | Black Enterprise

Samara Lynn, Black Enterprise Courtesy Aza Comics, Featured Image Now that the movie Black Panther has turned out to be a cultural and money-making phenomenon—interest in comic books and how to create them is bound to spike. There are several well-established black comic books writers and artists who have worked on major comic book titles including Batman, Deadpool, Spider-Man and more. Yet, more comic book creatives are going the independent route; launching their own superheroes and controlling their stories. Jazmin Truesdale is a comic book aficionado who launched Aza—a branding/comics/design company. Aza Comics has two titles, The Keepers and Aza […]

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Nikki Giovanni Blasts Trump Presidency: Black People Voting for Him Is Like a Vote for Slavery | Atlanta Black Star

Kiersten Willis, Atlanta Black Star Nikki Giovanni speaking at Emory University in 2008., Featured Image Nikki Giovanni wants Donald Trump’s presidency to crash and burn and said Black Americans voting for him was like a vote for slavery. “My heart breaks for the next generation with these fools in the White House,” she said. “Asking us to give Trump a chance is like asking Jews to give Hitler a chance. I read that 8 percent of Blacks voted for him. That’s like a vote for slavery.” Giovanni, 73, blasted Trump in The Huffington Post, Wednesday, Jan. 25, remarking on an […]

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A ‘Native Son’ Reimagined, With James Baldwin in Mind | The New York Times

Salamishah Tillet, The New York Times The playwright Suzan-Lori Parks, left, and the visual artist Rashid Johnson collaborated on the latest film adaptation of Richard Wright’s “Native Son,” setting it in present-day Chicago. Credit Gioncarlo Valentine for The New York Times, Featured Image its earliest conception, Richard Wright’s best-seller “Native Son” was envisioned for the screen. “To make the screen version of a novel into which I had put so much of myself was a dream which I had long hugged to my heart,” Richard Wright told the Portuguese magazine “Revista Branca” in 1950. The story of a young African-American […]

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