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Rediscovering “The Hampton Album,” a Renowned Record of African-American History After the Civil War | Feature Shoot

Credited as the first female photojournalist in the United States, Frances Benjamin Johnston (1864-1952) received a commission in 1899 to photograph the Hampton Institute, a private historically Black university located in Hampton, Virginia. Founded in 1868, just four years after the Civil War, the Hampton Institute was dedicated to the education of African-American men and women — and from 1878 to 1923, also maintained a program for Native Americans. The campus was located on the grounds of “Little Scotland,” a former plantation. Among its many illustrious alumni was no less than Booker T. Washington who taught at Hampton after he […]

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A Forgotten Lynching In Atlanta | WABE 90.1

The first country-wide memorial to African-American victims of lynching opened last year in downtown Montgomery, Alabama. While it’s called the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, the site is not government funded. It was built by the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal nonprofit that defends against wrongful convictions and racial discrimination. At the center of its six-acres is an open-air pavilion with 800 hanging steel columns. Each represents a county where a lynching took place and is engraved with the names of the victims. In total, the memorial lists more than 4,000 names touching 20 different states. Looking through the […]

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Birth of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) | Equal Justice Initiative

On April 15, 1960, black college students guided by civil rights activist Ella Baker formed the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) at Shaw University in North Carolina. Inspired by the sit-ins that college students waged throughout the South in February 1960, Ella Baker organized a conference at Shaw University to bring these young activists together. Members of the new student organization, known as SNCC (pronounced “snick”), dedicated themselves to challenging segregation by following the nonviolent, direct action practices of Reverend James Lawson and Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Some of SNCC’s most well-known members include Diane Nash, John Lewis, […]

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Body of US Rep. Cummings will lie in state at Capitol | PBS

BALTIMORE (AP) — The body of the late U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings will lie in state in the National Statuary Hall of the U.S. Capitol next week. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office said in a news release that a formal ceremony open to members of Congress, the Cummings family and invited guests will be held Thursday morning, followed by a public viewing. A wake and funeral for Cummings is planned the following day at New Psalmist Baptist Church in Baltimore, where he worshipped for nearly four decades. Morgan State University will also host a public viewing and celebration of his […]

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Emmett Till: new memorial to murdered teen is bulletproof | The Guardian

A new memorial to Emmett Till was dedicated on Saturday in Mississippi after previous historical markers were repeatedly vandalized. The new marker is bulletproof. Till, 14, was kidnapped, beaten and killed in 1955, hours after he was accused of whistling at a white woman. His body was found in a river days later. An all-white jury in Mississippi acquitted two white men of murder charges. The brutal killing helped spur the civil rights movement. Patrick Weems, executive director of the Emmett Till Memorial Commission, said the new marker was dedicated on Saturday. Members of Till’s family, including a cousin who […]

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‘Mormon Land’: The life of Jane Manning James — from her quest to be sealed to Joseph Smith to her patriarchal blessing by Hyrum Smith and her legacy for black Latter-day Saints | The Salt Lake Tribune

When historian historian Quincy Newell was researching 19th-century African American Mormons, one name kept popping up: Jane Manning James. This African American convert, who worked in church founder Joseph Smith’s household and eventually was “sealed” to him as a “servant,” probably still ranks as the most famous black female member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints this side of Gladys Knight. So Newell wrote a full-fledged biography of this pioneering black woman. Titled “Your Sister in the Gospel,” it was released earlier this year by Oxford University Press. Staff, The Salt Lake Tribune Jane Manning James. Edward […]

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