Florida Pardons the Groveland Four, 70 Years After Jim Crow-Era Rape Case | The New York Times The Jim Crow-era case attracted widespread attention in 1949. Shortly after the rape was reported, mobs of white residents set fire to homes and property belonging to black families in the Groveland area.

The Jim Crow-era case attracted widespread attention in 1949. Shortly after the rape was reported, mobs of white residents set fire to homes and property belonging to black families in the Groveland area.

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50 Years After Their Mug Shots, Portraits of Mississippi’s Freedom Riders | The New York Times [Lens] The journalist and photographer Eric Etheridge provides visual and oral histories of the courageous men and women known as the Freedom Riders in the 1960s.

Facebook0Twitter0MailMaurice Berger, The New York Times Gloria Bouknight, at 20 years old, and at 74 in 2015. While living in New York City, she discovered the Congress of Racial Equality, or CORE, on a visit to Harlem, and became an active member. Since then, she started a business representing European designers in the United States, […]

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Angela Davis Says She’s ‘Stunned’ After Award Is Revoked Over Her Views on Israel | The New York Times

Facebook0Twitter0MailNiraj Chokshi, The New York Times Angela Davis, the activist and scholar, said this week that she was “stunned” after a civil rights group in her native Birmingham, Ala., reversed its decision to honor her with an award amid protests over her support for a boycott of Israel. Professor Davis, once a global hero of […]

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Tracing the Real Betty Boop back to a Notorious Bootlegger’s Club in 1920s Harlem | Messy Nessy Chic

Facebook0Twitter0MailNatalie McKane, Messy Nessy Chic The 1920’s in Paris may have been roaring, but over in Harlem, they were stomping. New York’s playground was not short of an underground boozer, but there was one place in particular that dominated the scene; The Cotton Club. Patron Saint of jazz, notorious bootlegging and the home of the […]

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Watch Night Service in the Black Church in America: 150 Years After the Emancipation Proclamation | Huffpost “Watch Night Service” in the Black Church in America symbolizes the historical fact, that on the night of Dec. 31, 1862 during the Civil War, free and freed blacks living in the Union States gathered at churches and/or other safe spaces, while thousands of their enslaved black sisters and brothers stood, knelt and prayed on plantations and other slave holding sites in America — waiting for President Abraham Lincoln to sign the Emancipation Proclamation into law.

“Watch Night Service” in the Black Church in America symbolizes the historical fact, that on the night of Dec. 31, 1862 during the Civil War, free and freed blacks living in the Union States gathered at churches and/or other safe spaces, while thousands of their enslaved black sisters and brothers stood, knelt and prayed on plantations and other slave holding sites in America — waiting for President Abraham Lincoln to sign the Emancipation Proclamation into law.

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South Jersey Black church being turned into museum honoring Harriet Tubman | New York Amsterdam News

Facebook0Twitter0MailCyril Josh Barker, New York Amsterdam News A previously unknown portrait of Harriet Tubman. Library of Congress. Featured Image Reports indicate that a church in Cape May, N.J., is being transformed into a museum honoring abolitionist and political activist Harriet Tubman. The Macedonia Baptist Church is converting the next-door home of its late pastor, the […]

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Gladys West, the ‘hidden figure’ of GPS, inducted into Air Force hall of fame | The Hill Dr. Gladys West, a mathematician and one of the so-called “Hidden Figures” who was lesser known for her contributions to inventing GPS, has been inducted into the Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers Hall of Fame.

Dr. Gladys West, a mathematician and one of the so-called “Hidden Figures” who was lesser known for her contributions to inventing GPS, has been inducted into the Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers Hall of Fame.

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Even Though He Is Revered Today, MLK Was Widely Disliked by the American Public When He Was Killed | Smithsonian Magazine Seventy-five percent of Americans disapproved of the civil rights leader as he spoke out against the Vietnam War and economic disparity

Seventy-five percent of Americans disapproved of the civil rights leader as he spoke out against the Vietnam War and economic disparity

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