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The chilling details of Patrice Lumumba’s assassination and how he was dissolved in acid | Face2Face Africa

Since January 17, 1961, no one has been held accountable for the brutal murder of Congo’s independence leader and first prime minister Patrice Lumumba who was shot dead with two of his ministers, Joseph Okito and Maurice Mpolo. However, all fingers point to multinational perpetrators who sanctioned the elimination of one of Africa’s bravest politicians and independence heroes who stood his ground against colonizers. He led the Democratic Republic of Congo to independence on June 30, 1960, after the country was passed on from King Leopold II, who took control of it as his private property in the 1880s, to […]

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Afrochella Is Ghana’s Ultimate Party With A Purpose | Essence

Cofounder and CEO Abdul Karim Abdullah hopes Year of the Return visitors will feel “a vibration of the country and what it feels like to be with the people.” On January 1, 2019, London-based British-Ghanaian lawyer Yvonne Kramo was definitely feeling some FOMO when she tweeted, “Christmas/ NYE 2018 clearly belonged to Accra. #Afrochella.” Indeed, Idris Elba, Boris Kodjoe, Nicole Ari Parker, Naomi Campbell, Ebro Darden and many other celebs were in Accra, Ghana, for the inaugural Full Circle Festival. Their itinerary included an invitation to what seemed like the continent’s biggest day-into-night event, Afrochella. More than 10,000 people gathered […]

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Who were the Moors? | National Geographic

IF THE TERM “Moor” seems familiar but confusing, there’s a reason: Though the term can be found throughout literature, art, and history books, it does not actually describe a specific ethnicity or race. Instead, the concept of Moors has been used to describe alternatively the reign of Muslims in Spain, Europeans of African descent, and others for centuries. Derived from the Latin word “Maurus,” the term was originally used to describe Berbers and other people from the ancient Roman province of Mauretania in what is now North Africa. Over time, it was increasingly applied to Muslims living in Europe. Beginning […]

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Lost Ethiopian town comes from a forgotten empire that rivalled Rome | New Scientist

Archaeologists have uncovered an ancient buried town in Ethiopia that was inhabited for 1400 years. The town was part of a powerful civilisation called Aksum that dominated East Africa for centuries and traded with other great powers like the Roman Empire. “This is one of the most important ancient civilisations, but people [in the Western world] don’t know it,” says Michael Harrower of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. “Outside of Egypt and Sudan, it’s the earliest complex society or major civilisation in Africa.” The Empire of Aksum dominated East Africa and parts of Arabia from about 80 BC to […]

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READ: The revealing last letter written by Patrice Lumumba to the UN before his assassination | Face2Face Africa

Born on July 2, 1925, Patrice Emery Lumumba was only 36 when he was brutally assassinated on January 17, 1961. After being executed by firing squad, his body was exhumed and dissolved in acid. He was the first legally elected prime minister of the Republic of Congo after he helped the country gain its independence from Belgium in 1960. Patrice is known as one of the youngest African leaders becoming the first prime minister of Congo at 35 on June 30, 1960. His rule as Prime Minister lasted for 7 months until his arrest. Lumumba was also a Pan-Africanist and […]

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These Moving Photos Show Life in Apartheid-Era South Africa | Global Citizen

Celebrated South African photographer David Goldblatt took up photography in 1948, the same year the all-white National Party came into power and apartheid began in his country. Though Goldblatt, pictured above, was just 18 at the time, documenting the impact of apartheid — the government-implemented system of racial segregation in South Africa — would become his life-long mission. Over his decades-long career, the acclaimed photographer, who died last month at age 87, built a powerful legacy and body of work showing everyday life in his homeland through the apartheid years and after. A selection of his images will be on […]

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Museums in France Should Return African Treasures, Report Says | The New York Times

PARIS — The sprawling Quai Branly Museum in Paris is stuffed with treasure. It has some 70,000 objects from sub-Saharan Africa in its collection, including magnificent statues from present-day Benin and delicate paintings that once decorated church walls in Ethiopia. But a long-awaited report coming out this week could have a dramatic impact on what visitors see there, with repercussions for other international museums. The report was commissioned in March by President Emmanuel Macron of France from two academics, who were asked to draw up proposals for the restitution of pieces of African cultural heritage. It is due to be […]

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