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Canada’s first and only all-black battalion honoured with special stamp | Global News

Canada Post unveiled a limited edition stamp in Cherrybrook, N.S. on Tuesday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of black men who formed a segregated unit and fought during the First World War. The company said the stamp is a chance to honour the contributions of black Canadians. “This stamp honours men who stepped forward to serve this country in uniform but were denied the opportunity to fight,” said Jim Dunsworth, director of operations for Canada Post. Natasha Pace, Global News Full article @ Global News Share This +FacebookTwitterMail

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Corey Michael Hadley, Army infantryman and sharpshooter, dies at 30 | The Philadelphia Inquirer

After six years and three tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, Corey Michael Hadley returned home to Philadelphia in 2013. As an Army rifleman in a leadership role, Mr. Hadley had spent many days traveling door to door to root out armed militia members and terrorists who had sworn to kill Americans. For his service, he won multiple military honors. But his experience overseas left him anguished, he told his family. He struggled with depression and PTSD. And on Jan. 2, Mr. Hadley, 30, died by his own hand in his own home. “His wounds were slow-acting and invisible, […]

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Maj Christina Hopper Conquered Race, Gender, And The F-16 | Task & Purpose

Maj. Christina Hopper’s family is about as military as it gets. The legacy of service in her family made being a military brat a key part of her identity. Born in Norway while both her parents were stationed there with the Air Force, Hopper didn’t move to the United States until she was 4 years old. Her trajectory, following in her parents’ footsteps to the military, was normal, expected almost. But Hopper’s story deviates from the typical military brat-turned service member in that she didn’t only join the Air Force, she became the first black female pilot to fly a […]

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Tuskegee Airman Leslie Edwards dies at Cincinnati VA Hospital | WCPO

WCPO staff, WCPO Leslie Edwards, 93, of Springfield Township, is a Tuskegee Airman who served as a mechanic during World War II. (Photo: The Enquirer/Liz Dufour). Featured Image eslie Edwards didn’t talk about his military career during his daughter’s childhood — or her adulthood, for that matter. Imogene Bowers was 50 years old when she learned that her small, slight father had been one of the Tuskegee Airmen, the first black military aviators in United States history. “He did not allow any of the focus to be on him,” she said Tuesday night. “Even when you talked about the Tuskegee […]

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World War II veteran calls honorable discharge from Army to correct an ‘injustice’ nearly 75 years later ‘a miracle’ | Chicago Tribune

PHILADELPHIA World War II veteran Nelson Henry Jr. never thought he would see the day the Army would correct his discharge nearly 75 years after he was forced to leave the military because of the color of his skin. Henry, 95, of Philadelphia, received word Monday from the Army Correction of Military Records office that his discriminatory “blue discharge” from 1945 because he was black has been changed to honorable. He called the unanimous decision by a three-member board a miracle. “It’s unbelievable. I’m still wondering if it’s a dream,” Henry said in an interview Tuesday in his Logan Square […]

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Fighting Germans and Jim Crow: Role of Black Troops on D-Day | Military.com

BATON ROUGE, La. — It was the most massive amphibious invasion the world has ever seen, with tens of thousands of Allied troops spread out across the air and sea aiming to get a toehold in Normandy for the final assault on Nazi Germany. And while portrayals of D-Day often depict an all-white host of invaders, in fact it also included many African Americans. Roughly 2,000 African American troops are believed to have hit the shores of Normandy in various capacities on June 6, 1944. Serving in a U.S. military still-segregated by race, they encountered discrimination both in the service […]

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We Did It, They Hid It: How Memorial Day Was Stripped Of Its African American Roots | Black Then

What we now know as Memorial Day began as “Decoration Day” in the immediate aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It was a tradition initiated by former slaves to celebrate emancipationand commemorate those who died for that cause. These days, Memorial Day is arranged as a day “without politics”—a general patriotic celebration of all soldiers and veterans, regardless of the nature of the wars in which they participated. This is the opposite of how the day emerged, with explicitly partisan motivations, to celebrate those who fought for justice and liberation. The concept that the population must “remember the sacrifice” of […]

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West Point gets 1st black superintendent in 216-year history | Army Times

The Associated Press, Army Times POINT, N.Y. — Lt. Gen. Darryl A. Williams, a 1983 U.S. Military Academy graduate who has held high-ranking Army posts in Europe and Asia, will become the first black officer to command West Point in its 216-year history, academy officials announced Friday. Williams will assume command as the academy’s 60th superintendent during a ceremony Monday morning in West Point’s Jefferson Hall, school officials said. The native of Alexandria, Virginia, has served as the deputy chief of staff for the U.S. Army in Europe and the deputy commanding general for support for the 2nd Infantry Division […]

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General’s family: From segregation to command in 100 years | AP

Christina L. Myers, AP In this Feb. 9, 2019 photo, Brig. Gen. Milford H. Beagle, Jr. commanding general of Fort Jackson, speaks to the president of the Sgt. Isaac Woodard Historical Marker Association following the dedication ceremony in Batesburg-Leesville, S.C. Beagle, Jr. who now leads the Army’s Fort Jackson in South Carolina is descended from a soldier who served there in a segregated military more than a century ago. (AP Photo/Christina Myers). Featured Image , S.C. (AP) — Pvt. Walter Beagles arrived at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, in 1918, an African American draftee in a segregated Army that relegated black […]

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