West Point gets 1st black superintendent in 216-year history | Army Times

The Associated Press, Army Times WEST POINT, N.Y. — Lt. Gen. Darryl A. Williams, a 1983 U.S. Military Academy graduate who has held high-ranking Army posts in Europe and Asia, will become the first black officer to command West Point in its 216-year history, academy officials announced Friday. Williams will assume command as the academy’s […]

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General’s family: From segregation to command in 100 years | AP

Christina L. Myers, AP In this Feb. 9, 2019 photo, Brig. Gen. Milford H. Beagle, Jr. commanding general of Fort Jackson, speaks to the president of the Sgt. Isaac Woodard Historical Marker Association following the dedication ceremony in Batesburg-Leesville, S.C. Beagle, Jr. who now leads the Army’s Fort Jackson in South Carolina is descended from […]

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These Photos of a Segregated U.S. Navy Unit Were Lost for Decades. They Still Have a Story to Tell | Time

John Edwin Mason, Time Photographs by Wayne Miller—Magnum Photos. Featured Image There are many ways to photograph a black person, and it’s easy for things to go horribly wrong. America’s long history of racist imagery makes that quite clear. Wayne Miller, a white man, was notable for doing it right. In the mid-20th century, a […]

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Harlem Hellfighters: The black soldiers who brought jazz to Europe | BBC

Facebook0Twitter0MailVideo by Jane O’Brien and Bill McKenna, BBC World War One brought many social changes – not least, the introduction of jazz to Europe. Thanks to a black American regiment of musicians called the Harlem Hellfighters, the French discovered the joys of syncopation. More than a century on, US musician Jason Moran is raising fresh […]

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Africans Played Key, Often Unheralded, Role in World War I | The Afro American JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Amid the fanfare marking the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, little has been said about crucial participants in the conflict: Africans.

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Amid the fanfare marking the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, little has been said about crucial participants in the conflict: Africans.

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Black WWII veteran from Charleston faced bombs abroad, prejudice at home | The Post Courier

Facebook0Twitter0MailBo Petersen , The Post Courier Julian Snipe a 94-year-old WWII army veteran grew up on Johns Island in the 1920′s. When he was 18 he was the only one out of the five boys in his family to be drafted for World War II. “When you got to England it was different, France was […]

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How Black World War I vets shaped the civil rights movement | Futurity The hundreds of thousands of African Americans who served in the US Army during World War I and returned home as heroes soon faced many more battles over their equality in American society, according to historian Chad Williams.

The hundreds of thousands of African Americans who served in the US Army during World War I and returned home as heroes soon faced many more battles over their equality in American society, according to historian Chad Williams.

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Frank E. Petersen, First Black General in Marines, Dies at 83 | The New York Times (2015) Frank E. Petersen Jr., who suffered bruising racial indignities as a military enlistee in the 1950s and was even arrested at an officers’ club on suspicion of impersonating a lieutenant, but who endured to become the first black aviator and the first black general in the Marine Corps, died on Tuesday at his home in Stevensville, Md., near Annapolis. He was 83.

Frank E. Petersen Jr., who suffered bruising racial indignities as a military enlistee in the 1950s and was even arrested at an officers’ club on suspicion of impersonating a lieutenant, but who endured to become the first black aviator and the first black general in the Marine Corps, died on Tuesday at his home in Stevensville, Md., near Annapolis. He was 83.

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Meet the gallant all-black American female battalion that served in Europe during World War II | Face2Face Africa The success of the formation of the all black female battalion was thanks to Mary McLeod Bethune, an African American civil rights activist who at the time, appealed to the then-first lady of America, Eleanor Roosevelt, to create more meaningful roles for black women in the army to help balance out the shortage of soldiers.

The success of the formation of the all black female battalion was thanks to Mary McLeod Bethune, an African American civil rights activist who at the time, appealed to the then-first lady of America, Eleanor Roosevelt, to create more meaningful roles for black women in the army to help balance out the shortage of soldiers.

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