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Meet the child genius who became world’s youngest orchestra conductor at 11 | Face2Face Africa

At just 11 years old, Matthew Smith could play four instruments. He could play the guitar, drums, piano and viola. But what brought the child music prodigy to the limelight was when he led Nottingham Symphony Orchestra’s performance of Johann Strauss’s Die Fledermaus in April 2017. This made him the world’s youngest conductor ever to take to a professional stage in Britain. Leading a 75-strong orchestra as part of their ‘Animal Magic’ show at the Royal Concert Hall, the Nottingham lad conducted the whole of Strauss’ operetta from memory to the joy of the audience. Mildred Europa Taylor, Face2Face Africa […]

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Jimmy Heath, 93, Jazz Saxophonist and Composer, Is Dead | The New York Times

Jimmy Heath, a tenor saxophonist whose sharp and lively compositions became part of the midcentury jazz canon — and who found new prominence in middle age as a co-leader of a popular band with his two brothers — died on Sunday at his home in Loganville, Ga. He was 93. His grandson Fa Mtume confirmed his death. Mr. Heath’s saxophone sound was spare but playful, with a beaming tone that exuded both joy and command. But his reputation rested equally on his abilities as a composer and arranger for large ensembles, interpolating bebop’s crosshatched rhythms and extended improvisations into lush […]

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Heard but Not Seen | Slate

Black music in white spaces. . Away from home, I walk into unfamiliar spaces with my shoulders hunched and tight. Instinctively, I scan my surroundings, stretching every sense around the corners of the room until it feels safe. What the eye see? What the ears hear? What the nose smell? It’s Sunday afternoon and Toups South, a restaurant serving “regional southern cuisine” in the Lower Garden District of New Orleans, is mostly empty. A handful of patrons sit at the bar and at a smattering of tables. Everyone’s white: the patrons, the hostess, the bartenders. In the open kitchen I […]

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Cobb County high school cellist heading to Carnegie Hall | Fox5 Atlanta

POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. – The first time 16-year-old Khalil Payne picked up a cello, he says he felt an instant connection. “I’m going to try to find a good analogy,” Payne says. “It’s like, for the first time, when you finally find your favorite flavor of food.” Payne was a rising sixth-grader then but says he knew instinctively that the cello could take him anywhere. “You could say it’s almost like another world. When I start playing, I actually feel the music,” he said. “Because it’s one thing to just play an instrument, and it’s another to make and feel […]

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Remembering Curtis Mayfield Today on the 20th Anniversary of His Passing (December 26, 1999) | Albumism

Please join the Albumism team in celebrating Curtis Mayfield’s musical legacy and revisit audio & video highlights from his career below! Biography: Perhaps because he didn’t cross over to the pop audience as heavily as Motown’s stars, it may be that the scope of Curtis Mayfield’s talents and contributions have yet to be fully recognized. Judged merely by his records alone, the man’s legacy is enormous. As the leader of the Impressions, he recorded some of the finest soul vocal group music of the 1960s. As a solo artist in the 1970s, he helped pioneer funk and helped introduce hard-hitting […]

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Roberta Flack to Make Rare Appearance At GRAMMY Awards | American Songwriter

In a press release earlier this week, the Recording Academy® announced its 2020 Special Merit Awards recipients. The Lifetime Achievement Award honorees include Roberta Flack. The legendary musician and singer will make a rare public appearance to attend the GRAMMY Awards on Sunday, January 26, 2020 at Los Angeles’ STAPLES Center. “I am humbled and honored to be recognized in the company of such esteemed and diverse talents,” Flack said. “The dreams and love that we sing of connect our hearts – reaching across oceans, generations, and time. Our music is the legacy we leave to our children, the world’s […]

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What Louis Armstrong Really Thinks | The New Yorker

On October 31, 1965, Louis (Satchmo) Armstrong gave his first performance in New Orleans, his home town, in nine years. At twelve, he marched in parades for the Colored Waif’s Home for Boys, where he was given his first cornet. But he had publicly boycotted the city since its banning of integrated bands, in 1956. It took the Civil Rights Act, of 1964, to undo the law. Returning should have been a victory lap. At sixty-four, his popular appeal had never been broader. His recording of “Hello, Dolly!,” from the musical then in its initial run on Broadway, bumped the […]

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Review: A Brother and Sister Triumph Together at Carnegie Hall | The New York Times

The cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason gave a superb New York recital debut alongside the pianist Isata Kanneh-Mason. Mexican territory and who are recognized by the Mexican state as groups with the right of free determination. This ‘right of free determination’ includes the right to decide the internal forms of social, economic, political, and cultural organization, the right to preserve and enrich language and culture, and the right to elect representatives to the municipal council, among other things. In 2016, the British cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason won the prestigious BBC Young Musician of the Year Award. Early in 2018, his debut recording on […]

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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Finally Recognizes Woman Who Practically Invented Rock and Roll | Jezebel

This year’s inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame have been announced, and they have finally gotten around to adding Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who’s got a pretty good claim to having invented that shit. She got her credit the same year as Dire Straits and Bon Jovi. The Wall Street Journal reported that Tharpe—a major gospel star who broke ground with her electric guitar style and tackling of secular themes, predating the Sun Records crew and paving the way for basically everybody who came afterward—will be inducted in the “early influences” category. Jessica Diaz-Hurtado wrote of Tharpe’s distinctive […]

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Lovely Pics of Billie Holiday With Her Dog Mister in 1949 | Vintage Everyday

African American jazz singer Billie Holiday who had a career spanning nearly thirty years was known for her vocal delivery and improvisational skills. Her hit “What a Little Moonlight Can Do” became a jazz standard. Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, Holiday had mainstream success on labels such as Columbia and Decca. By the late 1940s, however, she was beset with legal troubles and drug abuse. After a short prison sentence, she performed at a sold-out concert at Carnegie Hall, but her reputation deteriorated because of her drug and alcohol problems. Staff,Vintage Everyday Photographs: photographed by Carl Van Vechten Full article […]

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