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What W. E. B. Du Bois Conveyed in His Captivating Infographics | The New Yorker

In 1893, Ida B. Wells published a pamphlet titled “The Reason Why the Colored American Is Not in the World’s Columbian Exposition.” The expo, which lasted for six months, was held in Chicago and was meant to chart the trajectory of the Americas in the four hundred years since Columbus had arrived. Though a handful of African-Americans had individual exhibits at the fair, there was none specifically dedicated to the history or the accomplishments of African-Americans as a people. Wells secured contributions for the pamphlet from Frederick Douglass, the educator and journalist Irvine Garland Penn, and the lawyer and activist […]

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Ernest J. Gaines, Author of The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, Dead at 86 | The Root

Ernest J. Gaines, a MacArthur fellow best known for the book The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, died at his home in Oscar, La., Tuesday. He was 86. In an obituary on their website, the Ernest J. Gaines Center at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, described the author as leaving behind a legacy that is “nothing short of brilliant.” Born Ernest James Gaines on Jan. 15, 1933 on a plantation in Pointe Coupee Parish, La., Gaines grew up the son of sharecroppers. As he told the Center in a video interview, he only attended school five to five-and-a-half months […]

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Will America’s Universities Point The Way Towards Reparations For Slavery? | Forbes

Georgetown University recently announced that it plans to raise around $400,000 a year to pay for reparations. They would go to the descendants of enslaved people who were exploited by Jesuit plantations and who were eventually sold to bring revenue to the university. A number of other universities, including Princeton Theological Seminary, have also announced plans for reparations. The moral case for reparations is easy to grasp. It represents compensation for various harms that are legally recognized in other contexts such as wage theft, wrongful imprisonment, battery, and sexual assault among other things. And there is an argument that the […]

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Civil Rights, One Person and One Photo at a Time | The New York Times

The hands of the father and his young daughter wave emphatically: the two are not in agreement. The man talks. His eyes are closed; he looks pained. The child listens, but gazes at a plate of cookies on the dinner table. The scene is not unusual: a father is telling his daughter that she will not be going to an amusement park. But he is doing so not because it is a school day, or because he is punishing her. He fears for her safety. James Karales, courtesy of the estate of James Karales Martin Luther King Jr. and Martin […]

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Meet the Black Architect who designed Duke University 37 years before he could have attended it | SHOPPE BLACK

In 1902, when Julian F. Abele graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in architecture, he was the school’s first-ever black graduate. The debonair Philadelphia-born architect went on to design hundreds of elegant public institutions, Gilded Age mansions, and huge swathes of a prestigious then-whites-only university’s campus. Yet the fact that an African-American architect worked on so many significant Beaux Arts-inspired buildings along the East Coast was virtually unknown until a political protest at Duke, the very university whose gracious campus he largely designed, was held in 1986. Abele’s contributions were not exactly hidden—during that era it was […]

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Woman, 23, who texted her dead father’s phone every day for four years finally gets a text back and discovers she had been sending messages to a bereaved man who lost his daughter in a car crash | Daily Mail

An Arkansas woman who lost her father four years ago but texted his phone every day to share updates on her life, received the shock of her life when one day she got a response from a bereaved man who lost his own daughter in a car crash. Chastity Patterson, 23, of Newport texted her father’s old phone number on Thursday, the night before the fourth anniversary of his death. ‘Hey Dad, it’s ME. Tomorrow is going to be a tough day again!’ Patterson said, not expecting an answer. After sending a long post mourning her father’s passing and mentioning […]

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Rediscovering “The Hampton Album,” a Renowned Record of African-American History After the Civil War | Feature Shoot

Credited as the first female photojournalist in the United States, Frances Benjamin Johnston (1864-1952) received a commission in 1899 to photograph the Hampton Institute, a private historically Black university located in Hampton, Virginia. Founded in 1868, just four years after the Civil War, the Hampton Institute was dedicated to the education of African-American men and women — and from 1878 to 1923, also maintained a program for Native Americans. The campus was located on the grounds of “Little Scotland,” a former plantation. Among its many illustrious alumni was no less than Booker T. Washington who taught at Hampton after he […]

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