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How Reginald Hudlin’s creative risk-taking has shaped black—and pop—culture | Fast Company

Digging into Reginald Hudlin’s résumé is like the most inspiring rabbit hole you could possibly tumble down. Most people know Hudlin as the director of such classic ’90s films as House Party and Boomerang. And while he’s been consistent on the directing front, most recently with his Netflix doc The Black Godfather, about music industry legend Clarence Avant, Hudlin also served as the first president of entertainment for BET in the early 2000s, where he developed popular shows including Sunday Best and the BET Hip-Hop Awards. He’s also produced highly regarded films and TV shows including Django Unchained and The […]

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Cicely Tyson Is Giving Advice We All Need In New ‘Cherish The Day’ Trailer | Essence

Cecily Tyson doesn’t let up. After popping up in Tyler Perry’s new Netflix film, A Fall From Grace, premiering Friday, the 95-year-old actress’ new role is in Ava DuVernay’s new romantic drama, Cherish The Day.. The very first trailer for the OWN series, which premieres next month, was released Thursday and is getting us even more excited about a new series we’re sure to tweet about with the hashtag #BlackLove. Cherish The Day is an anthology drama, starring Underground actor Alano Miller and The Mindy Project actress Xosha Roquemore. Each episode spans one important day in the couple’s lives, with […]

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‘Cane River’: A Forgotten Black Director’s Only Film Resurfaces After Being Lost for 40 years | IndieWire

Oscilloscope Laboratories has acquired the restored film for a theatrical run to begin in February. Debuting in 1982, “Cane River” was an independent-film curio: a race and colorism-themed love story with an all-black cast, written and directed by a black filmmaker, financed by wealthy black backers. The filmmaker’s name was Horace B. Jenkins, who spent most of his career working in public television, and died of a heart attack at the age of 42, just a few months after “Cane River” premiered. Largely financed by the Rhodes family of New Orleans (an African American family that has provided dignified burials […]

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The Troubling Fate of a 1973 Film About the First Black Man in the C.I.A. (2018) | The New Yorker

Ivan Dixon’s “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” from 1973, displays the bedrock of racist attitudes and assumptions that renders racist policies both inescapable and irreparable. Ivan Dixon’s 1973 film, “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” which is playing at Metrograph from Friday through Sunday (it’s also on DVD and streaming), is a political fiction, based on a novel by Sam Greenlee, about the first black man in the C.I.A. After leaving the agency, the agent, Dan Freeman (Lawrence Cook) moves to Chicago, and puts his training in guerrilla warfare to use: he organizes a group of black […]

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Matthew Cherry’s ‘Hair Love’ Receives Well Deserved Oscar Nomination | Because of Them We Can

Hair Love, the popular children’s book turned animated short by former NFL player, Matthew Cherry, gets nominated for an Oscar, USA Today reports. We first wrote about Cherry and his budding animated short in 2017. The NFL player turned filmmaker was on a mission to highlight the relationship between Black fathers and daughters in a short film, inspired by viral videos of fathers doing their daughters’ hair. At the time, Cherry said that his focus was representation, and he wanted to make sure that Black fathers and their daughters were the focus in his film. “Media is impressionable and when […]

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DGA Award Nominations Acknowledge Existence of Female Directors | Vulture

The Directors Guild of America has announced its nominees for Best Feature Film Director of 2019, and many of them are women — or at least many of them in the First-Time Feature Film Director category are women. Atlantics’ Mati Diop, Honey Boy’s Alma Har’el, and Queen & Slim’s Melina Matsoukas all received nominations. The main award category still has an entirely male roster of nominees, but even so! After a Golden Globes ceremony that excluded this year’s many female directors, the First-Time DGA category suggests a positive step forward. Also worth noting for anyone making Oscar predictions: no Todd […]

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Reading ‘Us’ Through Its T-shirts | The New York Times

With its star, Lupita Nyong’o, in awards contention this season, a look at the clothes that helped tell the story. You could watch Jordan Peele’s “Us” a dozen times and still not catch all of the symbolism, references and ideas tucked in it. Yes, scissors are clearly a thing, but what’s with that tuxedo T-shirt? The movie, ostensibly about a family, the Wilsons, hunted by its doppelgängers, is something of an awards contender. Its star, Lupita Nyong’o, is up for a Screen Actors Guild Award on Jan. 19 for her haunting portrayal of a mother with a painful past and […]

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First Black Oscar Winner Hattie McDaniel Lacks Recognition In Her Hometown Of Wichita | KMUW Wichita 89.1

Hattie McDaniel is best known as the first African-American to receive an Academy Award. The actress and radio performer has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and her image is on a U.S. postage stamp. Still, most people aren’t aware that McDaniel was born here, in Wichita. Her birthplace and childhood home, at 925 N. Wichita, is a familiar spot to Karla Burns. The longtime actress and singer recently reprised the role of the legendary Hattie McDaniel in “Hi Hat Hattie,” by Larry Parr. On a recent trip there, Burns approaches the site with reverence and respect. Carla […]

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