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First female, African-American Bishop to lead West TN Episcopal Diocese | WMCTV

Kontji Anthony, WMCTV Most Rev. Michael Curry, the first African-American presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church, was chief consecrator on Saturday, May 4, 2019, at Hope Church, for the Rt. Rev. Phoebe A. Roaf’s consecration service. Roaf is the Fourth Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of West Tennessee. (Lisa Buser/Special to The Daily Memphian). Featured Image , TN (WMC) – The stained-glass ceiling has shattered, as Reverend Phoebe Roaf is poised to step into the shoes of retiring Bishop Don Johnson. “The fact that in a couple of days I am about to be the fourth bishop of The Episcopal […]

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Dear Black Man: God Loves You! | My Muddy Walk With Christ

Carmen Byrd, My Muddy Walk With Christ a late-night conversation a few years ago, a friend of mine asked me if I could do one thing for the black community what would it be. My response was I would wrap my arms around the world and give every person of color a hug. I would love on my community especially the men in a way that could only be second to the love of Christ. In a world of colonization and oppression; where dollars are more important than souls it seems as if there is no love for people of […]

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Watch Night Service in the Black Church in America: 150 Years After the Emancipation Proclamation | Huffpost “Watch Night Service” in the Black Church in America symbolizes the historical fact, that on the night of Dec. 31, 1862 during the Civil War, free and freed blacks living in the Union States gathered at churches and/or other safe spaces, while thousands of their enslaved black sisters and brothers stood, knelt and prayed on plantations and other slave holding sites in America — waiting for President Abraham Lincoln to sign the Emancipation Proclamation into law.

“Watch Night Service” in the Black Church in America symbolizes the historical fact, that on the night of Dec. 31, 1862 during the Civil War, free and freed blacks living in the Union States gathered at churches and/or other safe spaces, while thousands of their enslaved black sisters and brothers stood, knelt and prayed on plantations and other slave holding sites in America — waiting for President Abraham Lincoln to sign the Emancipation Proclamation into law.

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