Press Enter / Return to begin your search.

How Many Black Male Teachers Did You Have Growing Up? | Black Enterprise

Vincent Cobb II and Rashiid Coleman are the founders behind The Black Male Educators Convening, an organization on a mission to triple the number of highly-effective black male teachers in Philadelphia public schools to 1,000 by 2025. Through a series of programs including a yearly conference, purpose career fair, two-year paid summer program, and membership alliance for black male educators, BMEC is sending a clear message: only 2% of teachers are black and male—and it’s not enough. On Oct. 12 – 14, the second annual BMEC conference will be held to advance and celebrate the development, recruitment, and retention of […]

Read More

Black students at Oxford University to get scholarships from black American tech entrepreneur | USA Today

SAN FRANCISCO — Technology investor and entrepreneur Arlan Hamilton is funding a new scholarship for black undergraduate students at Oxford University, a first for the educational institution. The scholarship, partly named for Hamilton’s mother, will cover fees and living costs for one undergraduate student a year for three years beginning in 2020. The value of the scholarship fund is about £220,000 (or nearly $300,000), Oxford said. A black woman who has written her own unique success story as an entrepreneur and investor in the mostly white and male tech sector, Hamilton is a former music tour manager without a college […]

Read More

Op-ed: Black male teachers have positive influence on students of all races | The State

I was wasting time on Twitter when I came across a post that stopped me mid-scroll. The original post posed a question: How many black male educators did you have in kindergarten through 12th grade. One of my former students chimed in with a shocking number: 1…Coach Thorne. That’s me; that’s who I was. I taught social studies at Blythewood High School for 11 years and was an assistant football coach. At first glance, the number 1 seems to be an indictment and a referendum on what we in education circles have known forever — we need more black men […]

Read More

Impact and not optics: How we can increase the number of African Americans in medicine | The St. Louis American

I am the lead author of a peer-reviewed manuscript that details how U.S. medical school diversity initiatives are leaving us behind. This is a summary of the article, which was published in Academic Medicine, and a call to action to improve our representation and the health of our communities. U.S. medical education diversity initiatives were born out of the Civil Rights Movement in an effort to increase the representation of African Americans in the physician workforce. Over the last 50 years, these efforts have evolved to include other minority groups that are underrepresented in medicine, and efforts to specifically identify […]

Read More

Nas Becomes ‘The Voice of Hennessy’ to Empower HBCU Students | Black Enterprise

Legendary hip-hop artist Nasir “Nas” Jones has teamed up with Hennessy and the Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) to uplift graduate students of color attending historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). The Queens-born rapper can be heard narrating a video promoting the Hennessy Fellows Program, a $10 million graduate scholarship initiative launched earlier this year to empower young African American leaders through financial assistance, access, and real-world work experience. “I’m proud to lend my voice to encourage enrollment in the Hennessy Fellows Program, a new graduate program created for students who want to blaze their own trails and pursue their […]

Read More

History and African American studies faculty receive three-year UC-HBCU Pathways Grant | UCI News

Jessica Millward, UCI associate professor of history, and Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, UCI associate professor of African American studies, have received a three-year, $271,902 UC-HBCU Pathways Grant to partner with Morgan State University, a public and historically black research university in Baltimore. Administered by the UC Office of the President, the grants encourage UC faculty to actively engage in collaboration and cooperation with faculty and students at historically black colleges and universities to attract and retain graduate scholars who reflect the communities of the world. During the summers of 2020, 2021 and 2022, Millward and Willoughby-Herard will host four HBCU students on […]

Read More

The New Director of Stanford’s Institute For Diversity In The Arts On How Art Breeds Social Change | Forbes

A-lan Holt’s job is to help young people understand the immense power of art. In her new role as the Director of Stanford’s Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA), she helps train undergraduates in how to use art as a tool for organizing and for bringing about social change. “For us, the arts are not just about how do you create a beautiful picture or how do you put on a moving performance,” she says. “They’re about how you test and take the temperature of a space, community, and environment, and how you work with that temperature to be […]

Read More

Rediscovering “The Hampton Album,” a Renowned Record of African-American History After the Civil War | Feature Shoot

Credited as the first female photojournalist in the United States, Frances Benjamin Johnston (1864-1952) received a commission in 1899 to photograph the Hampton Institute, a private historically Black university located in Hampton, Virginia. Founded in 1868, just four years after the Civil War, the Hampton Institute was dedicated to the education of African-American men and women — and from 1878 to 1923, also maintained a program for Native Americans. The campus was located on the grounds of “Little Scotland,” a former plantation. Among its many illustrious alumni was no less than Booker T. Washington who taught at Hampton after he […]

Read More

Too Many Black Students Aren’t Learning Their History in Schools | Education Post

ShaRhonda Knott-Dawson, Education Post hen I was in school, I was starved for information about who I really am. I ached to hear stories about people who look like me, or see the names of Black scholars in math or science, or even to talk about Africa, without talking about poverty and slavery. Today, too many Black schoolchildren are having the same experience. Too often, students’ first exposure to Black History occurs through the study of slavery. Too often, Africans are portrayed in schools as savage, barbaric people. Those who came to the Americas were “lucky” because they were saved […]

Read More