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The Unequal Financial Burden for Black Caregivers | OZY

Carlo St. Juste Jr. is on his way to bring his mother to a hospital appointment when he takes OZY’s call. A part-time acupuncturist and businessman, St. Juste is also the primary caregiver for his 69-year-old mom, who suffers from chronic kidney disease and diabetes. “I’ve organized my time so I can do these things for her,” says St. Juste, 38. Before taking care of his mom, he did the same for his paternal grandmother, so he’s used to the commitment and balance that constant care for loved ones require. But that’s not to say it’s easy. St. Juste, who […]

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Think Debtors Prisons Are a Thing of the Past? Not in Mississippi. | The Marshall Project

A few years ago, I read slave narratives to explore the lives of black agricultural workers after the end of the Civil War. JACKSON, Miss.—During her shifts at a Church’s Chicken, Annita Husband looked like the other employees. She wore the same blue and red polo shirt, greeted the same customers and slung the same fried chicken and biscuits. But after clocking out, Husband, a mother in her 40s, had to wait for a white van with barred windows and the seal of the Mississippi Department of Corrections on its sides. It delivered her to the Flowood Restitution Center, a […]

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The plunder of black wealth in Chicago, captured in film | The Chicago Reporter

Black families in Chicago lost an estimated $4 billion due to predatory contract buying, a Duke University’s Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity study found. Artist in residence Bruce Orenstein spoke to surviving victims. In just two short decades — while the post World War II housing boom created the wealth of the white middle class — blacks in Chicago were ripped off to the tune of $4 billion on land sale contracts, a common practice at the time that has been since outlawed but whose damage is still felt. A recent study from Duke University’s Samuel DuBois Cook […]

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Making black dollars work for us | The St. Louis American

All holidays in the U.S. are highly commercialized. Christmas is the most commercialized to the tune of $475 billion, according to National Retail Federation estimates. Lost in those billions is a big portion of the $1 trillion-plus spending power of black folks. Our consumerism rarely comes with demands for accountability and respect. Some of us think about how fast our dollars literally fly out of our communities while other ethnic groups’ dollars circulate longer and benefit them more. It really smacked me in a different way when I heard Maggie Anderson speak at a program hosted by the Coalition of […]

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Tracy McGrady Is Launching An Advisory Program To Keep Young Athletes From Going Broke | Forbes

When athletes turn pro, they’re often exposed to the kind of money they never could have imagined—and a newfound need to manage that money responsibly. It can be hard to resist the temptation to spend lavishly and instead start thinking of the future, but that sort of lack of foresight has landed a number of athletes and entertainers in bankruptcy, or worse. Enter Tracy McGrady, who is looking to use his knowledge of the financial world and his experiences as an NBA superstar to begin a financial advisory program to help athletes avoid the financial pitfalls that can be waiting […]

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Starbucks hires Nzinga Shaw as global Chief Inclusion & Diversity Officer | Face2Face Africa

American coffee company and coffeehouse chain, Starbucks has hired Nzinga Shaw as global chief inclusion and diversity officer. After five years, Shaw exits the Atlanta Hawks and Philips Arena where she has been chief diversity and inclusion officer. “I am overly grateful to the Hawks ownership, CEO Steve Koonin and NBA organization for giving me an opportunity to create internal and external programs with diversity at the core,” Shaw wrote on LinkedIn. Theodora Aidoo, Face2Face Africa Credit: Careergirls.org Full article @ Face2Face Africa Share This +FacebookTwitterMail

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No Shortage of Need | Baltimore Magazine

Homelessness, gross inequities in education, shortages of affordable housing, a lack of job training, few options for underprivileged inner-city youth, and a thriving and deadly drug trade. Are we picking on poor, old, bad-mouthed Baltimore again? Actually, we could be talking about the challenges facing any large American city—check out St. Louis, New Orleans, Detroit, Birmingham, and even Chicago. But in the pages that follow, we look at the Baltimoreans who are wrestling with their hometown problems, not just wringing their hands. And we had no problem finding some great examples of people giving their time, money, and hearts to […]

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Success Comes from Affirming Your Potential | Harvard Business Review

When you see how underrepresented African-Americans are in current leadership roles, it can be easy to get discouraged about their prospects for leadership advancement. Despite a rise in the number of black college and university graduates, just 8% of managers and under 4% of CEOs are black. In the Fortune 500 companies there are currently only three black chief executives, down from a high of 12 in 2002. We, however, are not discouraged. In the course of our research, we have met myriad African-American leaders who, despite being underestimated, underappreciated, and under-resourced, have prospered and achieved incredible success. How do […]

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