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White people assume niceness is the answer to racial inequality. It’s not | The Guardian

“While most of us see ourselves as ‘not racist’, we continue to reproduce racist outcomes and live segregated lives.” I am white. As an academic, consultant and writer on white racial identity and race relations, I speak daily with other white people about the meaning of race in our lives. These conversations are critical because, by virtually every measure, racial inequality persists, and institutions continue to be overwhelmingly controlled by white people. While most of us see ourselves as “not racist”, we continue to reproduce racist outcomes and live segregated lives. In the racial equity workshops I lead for American […]

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After the Eviction Notice | The New York Times

In North Charleston, S.C., a struggling family pulls together for the bitter experience of moving out. Shanatea Turner’s landlord filed eviction papers against her in mid-November. By early December, the pile of belongings she had no choice but to throw out was starting to grow on the curb. And the family she had tried to hold together was breaking up. A year and a half ago, Shanatea’s daughter Twanda Porterfield was pregnant and living in a hotel. She had lost her two children to the state’s foster care system. Shanatea moved from Orlando vowing to find a home for her […]

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When Oakland Was a ‘Chocolate City’: A Brief History of Festival at the Lake | KQED

Lake Merritt, the man-made lake at the center of Oakland, has been called the city’s beating heart. It is more than a body of water — it is where people gather to celebrate and protest, to party and to mourn. After the election of President Trump, the lake is where liberal Oaklanders showed up to hold hands around the 3.4-mile circumference. When the Ghost Ship fire took 36 lives in December 2016 — many deeply connected to the community — the lake is where people came to hold vigil. And for 16 years — from 1982 until 1997 — the […]

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Fort Worth police officer who fatally shot Atatiana Jefferson indicted on murder charge | NBC News

The case against Aaron Dean, 35, led to a rare murder charge against a police officer when he was initially arrested just days after the October shooting. A Texas grand jury on Friday indicted a former Fort Worth police officer for murder after he fatally shot a woman who had been babysitting her nephew at home in a case that drew public outcry for police accountability. The Tarrant County District Attorney’s Office confirmed the indictment against the former officer, Aaron Dean, 35, in the shooting death of Atatiana Jefferson, a 28-year-old pre-med graduate student. Lee Merritt, an attorney for Jefferson’s […]

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This App Matches People of Color with a Therapist Who Shares a Similar Background | Black Enterprise

Former investment banker Eric Coly decided to launch a startup after a close friend confided to him that she needed counseling. She was struggling to find a therapist, not because there weren’t any available, her issue was finding a black therapist. Coly, a native of Senegal, understood her situation all too well. He had been diagnosed with depression and knew firsthand the lack of therapists of color in the United States. The U.S. has around 100,000 therapists, 86% are white, 5% Asian, 5% Hispanic, and 4% black. This is a far cry from diverse representation based on the U.S. population […]

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Making black dollars work for us | The St. Louis American

All holidays in the U.S. are highly commercialized. Christmas is the most commercialized to the tune of $475 billion, according to National Retail Federation estimates. Lost in those billions is a big portion of the $1 trillion-plus spending power of black folks. Our consumerism rarely comes with demands for accountability and respect. Some of us think about how fast our dollars literally fly out of our communities while other ethnic groups’ dollars circulate longer and benefit them more. It really smacked me in a different way when I heard Maggie Anderson speak at a program hosted by the Coalition of […]

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Being a protective black mom isn’t a parenting choice—it’s the only choice | Quartz

Salena Alston is an involved parent. The 40-year-old mother of seven describes herself as a “liberally strict” mom who keeps track of her kids’ friends and whereabouts but also encourages their independence and accountability. Alston wouldn’t call herself a helicopter parent per se, but it’s a trope that she sometimes identifies with, simply out of necessity. Raising black children in a predominantly white suburb of Atlanta sometimes requires an extra bit of “hovering.” Recently, Alston and her husband saw their youngest, an 11-year-old boy, swinging on the net at their neighborhood’s tennis court with his friends, who were white. The […]

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Meet the Black woman who has fed thousands for free on thanksgiving for almost 40 years | Yen

Kind-hearted Janet Easley has been serving Thanksgiving dinner to thousands of needy people in central Indiana every holiday for the last 38 years. Indianapublicmedia.org writes that Janet Easley has welcomed everyone to the Turner Family Thanksgiving Meal, which will be held at three locations across Indianapolis in 2019. Easley has invited everybody including children and parents especially single parents going through hard times. She will be serving “Turkey, potatoes or mashed potatoes, corn and green beans. Thus any sober assessment of this history must conclude that the present objections to cancel culture are not so much concerned with the weapon, […]

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