Restoration of Horace Jenkins’ African-American Romeo & Juliet to Premiere in New Orleans and DC | Roger Ebert.com A few years ago producer Sandra Schulberg told me a mesmerizing story about a film made by the late artist, Horace Jenkins, who died before it's theatrical release, and whose film lay lost for three decades.

A few years ago producer Sandra Schulberg told me a mesmerizing story about a film made by the late artist, Horace Jenkins, who died before it’s theatrical release, and whose film lay lost for three decades.

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‘Passing for white’: how a taboo film genre is being revived to expose racial privilege | The Guardian Rebecca Hall’s directorial debut is an adaptation of Nella Larsen’s 1929 novel Passing, a theme little seen since the likes of Show Boat and Pinky

Rebecca Hall’s directorial debut is an adaptation of Nella Larsen’s 1929 novel Passing, a theme little seen since the likes of Show Boat and Pinky.

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From Birth of a Nation to BlacKkKlansman: Hollywood’s complex relationship with the KKK | The Guardian Spike Lee’s latest film, about a black detective infiltrating the Klan, once again raises the issue of how seriously cinema should take the white supremacist group

Spike Lee’s latest film, about a black detective infiltrating the Klan, once again raises the issue of how seriously cinema should take the white supremacist group.

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With BlacKkKlansman, Spike Lee Sounds the Alarm About America’s Past and Present | The Atlantic The director’s newest film follows a policeman who successfully infiltrated the KKK in the 1970s, but the story it tells is also very much about the U.S. today.

The director’s newest film follows a policeman who successfully infiltrated the KKK in the 1970s, but the story it tells is also very much about the U.S. today.

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The Troubling Fate of a 1973 Film About the First Black Man in the C.I.A. | The New Yorker Ivan Dixon’s 1973 film, “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” which is playing at Metrograph from Friday through Sunday (it’s also on DVD and streaming), is a political fiction, based on a novel by Sam Greenlee, about the first black man in the C.I.A.

Ivan Dixon’s 1973 film, “The Spook Who Sat by the Door,” which is playing at Metrograph from Friday through Sunday (it’s also on DVD and streaming), is a political fiction, based on a novel by Sam Greenlee, about the first black man in the C.I.A.

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WATCH: ‘Quest’ Follows a Black Family’s Highs, Lows for 8 Years | Colorlines The PBS-streamed documentary follows the Rainey family throughout the Obama administration to offer a rare, complex portrait of a working-class Black family.

The PBS-streamed documentary follows the Rainey family throughout the Obama administration to offer a rare, complex portrait of a working-class Black family.

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Chloe And Halle Bailey Are More Than Alright | NPR It's a cliché, but it's true: Adults are always complaining about the next generation. Chloe and Halle Bailey have something to say about that.

It’s a cliché, but it’s true: Adults are always complaining about the next generation. Chloe and Halle Bailey have something to say about that.

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