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How Augusta Savage, a Black Art Teacher and Sculptor, Helped Shape the Harlem Renaissance | My Modern Met

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How Augusta Savage, a Black Art Teacher and Sculptor, Helped Shape the Harlem Renaissance | My Modern Met

Augusta Savage, African American Art, Black Art, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, Wriit,

By  Kelly Richman-Abdou, My Modern Met

In the early 20th century, a remarkable renaissance emerged in Harlem. On the historic heels of the Great Migration, a mass exodus of over six million African Americans fleeing the segregated South, the New York City neighborhood became a cultural hub for Black creatives. While a wealth of figures formed this “golden age” of art, music, and literature, the contributions of sculptor Augusta Savage can be found at its core.

As a teacher and advocate for African Americans in the arts, Savage shaped the careers of some of the Harlem Renaissance‘s most prominent artists. While she was a skilled ceramicist her in own right, Savage considered the impression she left on her students to be her true masterpiece. “I have created nothing really beautiful, really lasting, but if I can inspire one of these youngsters to develop the talent I know they possess, then my monument will be in their work,” she said

See Also
Onaje Henderson, Omari Taylor, Troy Taylor, ZuCot Gallery, African American Art, Black Art, African American Artists, Black Artists, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, WRIIT, TRYB,

Featured Image, Portrait of Augusta Savage. Photo: Wikimedia Commons Public Domain
Full article @ My Modern Met

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