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Laws In Sixteen States Banning Interracial Marriage Finally Found Unconstitutional | EJI, Equal Justice Initiative

Laws In Sixteen States Banning Interracial Marriage Finally Found Unconstitutional | EJI, Equal Justice Initiative

Richard and Mildred Loving, African American Activist, Black Activist, African American History, Black History, Civil Rights Activist, Civil Rights, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, Wriit,

By EJI Staff, EJI, Equal Justice Initiative

On June 12, 1967, the United States Supreme Court unanimously decided Loving v. Virginia, declaring state bans on interracial marriage unconstitutional and striking down a total of sixteen states with laws still active throughout the country.

Richard and Mildred Loving married in Washington, D.C. in 1958 — but when they returned to their home in Caroline County, Virginia, they were arrested and charged with felony offenses just for being husband and wife. Under Virginia law, Richard was white, Mildred was Black, and interracial marriage was illegal. Facing prison time, the Lovings pleaded guilty to the charges in 1959, received a suspended sentence and were ordered to leave the state for twenty-five years.

See Also
W. E. B. DuBois, Reconstruction, American History, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, Wriit,

Featured Image, Mildred and Richard Loving with their daughter Peggy, Richard’s mother, Lola, and Mildred’s sister Garnet on the front porch of Mildred’s mother’s house, Caroline County, VA. Estate of Grey Villet
Full article @ EJI, Equal Justice Initiative

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