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The Photos That Lifted Up the Black Is Beautiful Movement | The New York Times

The Photos That Lifted Up the Black Is Beautiful Movement | The New York Times

Black Is Beautiful, Black Is Beautiful Movement, Kwame Brathwaite, Black History, African American History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, Allegory Allegory, Wriit,

For over 50 years, the photographer Kwame Brathwaite captured African-American beauty and fashion, giving visual power to black power.

Black Is Beautiful, Black Is Beautiful Movement, Kwame Brathwaite, Black History, African American History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, Allegory Allegory, Wriit,

– Untitled (Photo shoot at a school for one of the many modeling groups who had begun to embrace natural hairstyles in the 1960s), 1966. Credit…Kwame Brathwaite/Courtesy of Philip Martin Gallery, Los Angeles –

Black Is Beautiful, Black Is Beautiful Movement, Kwame Brathwaite, Black History, African American History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, Allegory Allegory, Wriit,

– Untitled (Carolee Prince — Designer), 1964. Credit…Kwame Brathwaite/Courtesy of Philip Martin Gallery, Los Angeles –

The intersection of West 125th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem was, for decades, a center of black nationalism. Street orators — that’s what they were called — climbed onto stepladders and made impassioned calls for African liberation.

Black Is Beautiful, Black Is Beautiful Movement, Kwame Brathwaite, Black History, African American History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, Allegory Allegory, Wriit,

– Untitled (Men at photoshoot at a school in the 1960s), 1966. Credit…Kwame Brathwaite/Courtesy of Philip Martin Gallery, Los Angeles –

Black Is Beautiful, Black Is Beautiful Movement, Kwame Brathwaite, Black History, African American History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, Allegory Allegory, Wriit,

– Untitled (Fashion show at Renaissance Casino and Ballroom), 1967. Credit…Kwame Brathwaite/Courtesy of Philip Martin Gallery, Los Angeles Image –

See Also
Rosa Parks, African American History, Black History, Civil Rights Activist, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, Wriit,

When Kwame Brathwaite and his brother Elombe Brath were teenagers in the 1950s, they would walk there from their dad’s dry cleaning shop and listen, entranced, for hours. Mr. Brath once recounted the story of Carlos Cooks, a student of Marcus Garvey, bellowing to a black woman walking by: “Your hair has more intelligence than you. In two weeks, your hair is willing to go back to Africa and you’ll still be jivin’ on the corner.” (Two weeks was just about how long hot-combed styles kept a black woman’s hair straight.)

By Melissa Smith, The New York Times
Featured Images, Kwame Brathwaite/Courtesy of Philip Martin Gallery, Los Angeles
Full article @ The New York Times

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