Now Reading
U.S. Supreme Court Finally Ends Segregated Courtroom Seating | EJI, A History of Racial Injustice

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT – SCROLL DOWN

U.S. Supreme Court Finally Ends Segregated Courtroom Seating | EJI, A History of Racial Injustice

Racism, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willoughby Avenue, Writt,

By EJI Staff, EJI

On April 29, 1963, the United States Supreme Court struck down segregated courtroom seating and overturned the contempt conviction of a black man who refused to sit in a Virginia courtroom’s “Negro” section.

A year earlier, in April 1962, Ford T. Johnson, Jr. appeared in a Richmond, Virginia, city traffic court. Unaware of the courtroom’s segregated seating, Mr. Johnson — a black man — first sat in a section reserved for white people. When he was ordered to move, Mr. Johnson refused the judge’s order to re-seat himself in the black section and said he would prefer to stand. He was immediately convicted of contempt and fined ten dollars.

See Also
Civil Rights, Civil Rights Protest, Alabama Protest, African American History, Black History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, WRIIT, TRYB,

Full article @ EJI, A History of Racial Justice

Scroll To Top