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Lint Shaw Lynched in Georgia Eight Hours Before Trial | EJI, A History of Racial Injustice

Lint Shaw Lynched in Georgia Eight Hours Before Trial | EJI, A History of Racial Injustice

Lint Shaw, Colbert Georgia, Lynching, American Racism, Racism, American History, Black History, U.S. History, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KINDR'D, Willougby Avenue, Wriit,

By EJI Staff, EJI

On April 28, 1936, a 45-year-old black farmer named Lint Shaw was shot to death by a mob of forty white men in Colbert, Georgia – just eight hours before he was scheduled to go on trial on allegations of attempting to assault two white women.

During the era of racial terror, accusations of “attempted assault” lodged against black men were often based on merely looking at or accidentally bumping into a white woman, smiling, winking, getting too close, or being alone with a white woman in the wrong place. The deep racial hostility permeating Southern society meant that accusations lodged against black people – especially against black men by white women or girls – were rarely subject to serious scrutiny by the police, press, or lynch mobs.

See Also
Nikole Hannah-Jones, 1619 Project, 1619, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMN, KINDR'D Magazine, KOLUMN, Willoughby Avenue, Wriit,

Featured Image, James Estrin for The New York Times
Full article @ EJI, A History of Racial Justice

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