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HBCUs​ Set Foundation for Black Politicians in Key Positions | The Washington Informer

HBCUs​ Set Foundation for Black Politicians in Key Positions | The Washington Informer What Kamala Harris, Alma Adams, Andrew Gillum and Stacey Abrams all have in common, in addition to being influential in U.S. politics, is they’re graduates of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) — Howard University, North Carolina A&T, Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University and Spelman College.

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Approximately 40 percent of the members of Congress are HBCU graduates, according to the Network Journal, a Black professional and small business magazine. And recipients of The United Negro College Fund and Thurgood Marshall Foundation scholarships graduate from college at rates well above the national average.

“We’re producing outstanding leaders in all of the major professions,” said Harry L. Williams, president and CEO of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund and former Delaware State president. “Anytime you can look at [HBCU] success stories, it just enhances their relevancy and continues to move them forward in a positive way.”

This year, a record 38 women of color were elected to Congress. Many of them are HBCU graduates.


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