Fourteen states stretching from Kansas to Delaware, including all of the Deep South, are joining to promote the U.S. Civil Rights Trail, which will highlight about 130 sites linked to the modern civil rights movement. The joint effort is being unveiled as part of the MLK holiday weekend.

Individual Southern states have used such promotions for years, beginning with a black history trail launched by Alabama in the 1980s, but never before have they joined together in a single push to bolster civil rights tourism, said Lee Sentell, a leader of the effort.

African American History, Black History, Martin Luther King Jr., MLK, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNNational Civil Rights Museum, AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

African American History, Black History, Martin Luther King Jr., MLK, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNInternational Civil Rights Center & Museum, AP Photo/Skip Foreman

“Everyone wants to showcase their landmarks. For the U.S. Civil Rights Trail, we’re saying ‘What happened here changed the world,'” said Sentell, Alabama’s tourism director.

African American History, Black History, Martin Luther King Jr., MLK, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNBrown v. Board of Education National Historic Site, AP Photo/Orlin Wagner

African American History, Black History, Martin Luther King Jr., MLK, KOLUMN Magazine, KOLUMNTomb of Martin Luther King Jr., and his wife Coretta Scott King, AP Photo/Branden Camp


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